Duvall Histories from Beers History




 
A. B. Duvall, p. 1214
  A. B. DUVALL The Duvall family, of which this gentleman is a prominent
  representative, has for many years been closely associated with the 
  progress and improvement of Washington county.
  Alexander and Elizabeth Duvall were natives of Maryland, born of 
  French descent.
  They came to Pennsylvania many years ago, and located in Washington
  county, where he lived several years, and then settled on a farm in 
  Fayette county, near Brownsville, where he died at the age of eighty
  -five years. Of their children are named John, David, Jacob, Lewis, 
  Eli, Jehu, Hiram and Elizabeth, all now deceased.

  David Duvall was born April 7, 1785, in East Pike Run township, Washington
  Co., Penn., and passed his youth on the home farm. He began life 
  with no financial aid, but willing hands, an active brain, and stout
  body proved sufficient capital, and he soon acquired a comfortable
  property, all in agricultural pursuits. When a young man he was united
  in marriage with Mary Bailey, who was born in 1782, in East Pike
  Run township, and they reared the following family of children: Nancy,
  widow of S. Robison, now residing in California, Washington Co., 
  Penn.; Eliza, wife of John B. Hanen, of East Pike Run township; Ruth,
  widow of George Garrett, a resident of California, Washington
  county; Mary; Alexander B.; John; Lewis; Abigail, and Sarah, of whom 
  the four last mentioned are now deceased. The father in his political
  affiliations voted with the Republican party. He died August 24, 1865, 
  having been preceded by his wife in 1862.

  Alexander B. Duvall, son of David and Mary (Bailey) Duvall, was born 
  March 19, 1825, in East Pike Run township, Washington Co., Penn. 
  He received a subscription-school education, and grew to manhood
  on the home farm, working the old place on shares until the death 
  of his father. In 1870 he was united in marriage with Josephine Pester,
  who was born in Washington county, Penn., a daughter of Moses and
  Elizabeth (Smith) Pester, also natives of this county. Her father
  was a cabinet maker at Coal Centre, Penn., and in politics voted 
  with the Democratic party. He and his wife died in Coal Centre, leaving
  two children, Ann and Josephine (Mrs. Duvall). To the union of Alexander
  B. and Josephine (Pester) Duvall the following children have been
  born: Emma, David R., Nellie S., Carolus, Anna Thames, Chauncy Slocum,
  John Shanton, Flora G., Belva L., Pierre L., Alexander V., Cassius
  A., and Jessie.

  The old homestead contains 210 acres of well-cultivated land, and
  is universally admitted to be one of the finest farms in Washington 
  county. In 1875 Mr. Duvall erected a handsome two-story house upon 
  the property, commanding a beautiful landscape view for many miles,
  carrying the eye to the mountain beyond. Since 1852 he has been a member 
  of the F. & A. M. at Coal Centre. He is a fearless, conscientious 
  man, and worships at the Disciple Church, his wife being identified
  with the Methodist Episcopal denomination. 

George W. Duvall, p. 1226
  GEORGE W. DUVALL is a grandson of Lewis and Hannah Duvall, who were 
  pioneer settlers of Washington county, Penn., and died on the home farm.

  John Duvall, father of subject, was born and reared on the home place
  in Washington county, and always followed agricultural pursuits,
  giving considerable attention to stock raising. He voted with the 
  Republican party. He was first married to Mary Yarty, who bore him 
  seven children, viz.: George W., Hannah, Amanda (wife of William 
  Hornbake, of West Pike Run township), Ellen (married to Frank Bake, a
  carpenter, of Allenport, this county), Elizabeth, Lewis, and John L.
  (a farmer of Fayette county, Penn.). The mother died in 1869, and Mr.
  Duvall was then married to Elizabeth Lash, whose children were Tory 
  (deceased), Robert, Isaac (both of whom are living in Charleroi,
  Washington county), William (a painter of Charleroi), and Frank (a farmer, 
  of Fayette  county, Penn.). The father died October 3, 1884, and 
  April 27, 1885 the wife and mother passed away. She was a member
  of the M. E. Church.

  George W. Duvall, son of John and Mary Duvall, was born January 5, 1853, 
  in West Pike Run township, Washington Co., Penn., and was educated
  in the district schools.
  On February 22, 1877, he married Miss Maggie Marker, who was born 
  September 8, 1854, in Washington county, Penn., a daughter of Lewis 
  and Eliza (Williams) Marker, natives of this county, whose children
  were as follows: John, a resident of West Brownsville, Penn.; William,
  living in East Pike Run township; James, living in West Brownsville;
  Charles, also of West Brownsville; Maggie, wife of George W. Duvall, 
  and Mary, deceased. The father followed farming all his life, and in
  politics voted with the Democratic party. He died August 31, 1891,
  his wife having passed away in 1862. They were members of the M. E.
  Church. George W. and Maggie (Marker) Duvall have two sons: Charles
  W., born September 16, 1880, and John L., born August 23, 1883. 

  Mr. Duvall owns the old homestead of eighty-four acres, where his 
  grandfather first located many years ago. In politics he is a Republican,
  and he has served as school director for the past three years. 

James M. Duvall, p. 1357 
  JAMES M. DUVALL was born November 24, 1839, in East Pike Run township,
  Washington Co., Penn. He is a grandson of Jacob and Jane (Patterson)
  Duvall, who were natives of Maryland and descended from Irish ancestry.
  They came to Washington county, Penn., many years ago, where the 
  following children were born to them: Mary, widow of Moses Billingsley, 
  of California, Penn.; Harriet, widow of Robert Duvall, of     Illinois; 
  Samantha, wife of Lewis J. Weaver, a farmer of East Pike Run township;
  Jefferson, a resident of East Pike Run township, and eight others
  who are now deceased. The parents died in East Pike Run township.

  Alexander Duvall was born in 1810, on the home farm in East Pike Run
  township, Washington Co., Penn., and passed his youth under the 
  parental roof. He was married to Jemima Hannon, who was born in 1809, 
  and they were the parents of seven children, namely: Henry, a farmer 
  of Fayette county, Penn.; Jacob, an agriculturist of Allen township, 
  Washington county; James M., of whom a sketch follows; Jefferson,
  a farmer of East Pike Run township; Isabella, wife of Jacob Crow, 
  now of Madison county, Iowa; Mary M., wife of Isaac W. Richards,
  and Julia, married to William H. Jackman, a farmer of East Pike Run
  township. The father of this family died in 1884, and in 1887 the mother 
  passed away. They were members of the M. E. Church. 

  James M. Duvall was reared and educated on the home place, and on April
  10, 1865, was united in marriage with Martha A. Crow, who was born 
  in 1846, in Allen township, this county, daughter of Azariah and 
  Sarah A. (Murphy) Crow, both natives of Washington county, Penn., 
  where the father has followed farming. Mr. and Mrs. Crow have had six 
  children, namely: Jacob, John, Martha A. (wife of James M. Duvall),
  Jane (married to Theodore Jackman), Benjamin, and one deceased in 
  infancy. The father of this family is now farming in Howell county,
  Missouri. To the union of James M. and Martha (Crow) Duvall have 
  been born two children, viz.: 
  Alva J. and Minnie M., wife of Eli Harmal, a farmer of East Pike Run
  township. James M. Duvall is a very progressive, energetic citizen,
  and is an active member of the Republican party. He has served three 
  terms as township assessor, two as constable, and has been school 
  director for about fourteen years. Socially he is a member of the
  American Master Mechanics, Lodge No. 371, at Coal Centre, Penn. 
  The home place, a well-improved farm, is situated two miles northwest
  of Coal Centre.
JP Duvall 
Jefferson P. Duvall, p. 488
  JEFFERSON P. DUVALL. The Duvall family, of which 
  the subject of these lines is a well-known member, 
  has for many years been closely associated with 
  the progress and improvement of Washington county.

  Alexander and Elizabeth Duvall were natives of 
  Maryland, descended from French ancestors. 
  They came to America many years ago and located
  on a farm in Washington county, Penn., where 
  Alexander died at the age of eighty-five years. 
  Of his children are named John, David, Jacob,
  Lewis, Eli, Jehu, Hiram and Elizabeth, all now
  deceased.

  Jacob Duvall was born February 17, 1789, on the 
  old home farm in Washington county, Penn., where
  he grew to manhood. In 1810 he was married to 
  Jane Patterson, who was born January 29, 1797,
  and their children were Mary (wife of Moses 
  Billingsley), Harriet (married to Robert Duvall,
  a resident of Appanoose county, Iowa), Samantha
  (wife of Lewis J. Weaver, a farmer of East Pike
  Run township), Jefferson P. (the subject of this
  sketch), Alexander, Harrison, Emily, Jane, Thomas, 
  Ruth and two unnamed. Of this family are yet 
  living Mary, Harriet, Samantha and Jefferson P. 
  The father was a prominent agriculturist, and died
  in 1864, the mother having passed away ten years prior
  to his demise.

  Jefferson P. Duvall was born April 10, 1830, in East Pike Run township,
  Washington Co., Penn., and remained on the old place during his 
  youth, securing a common-school education. In early life he learned
  and followed the trade of millwright, and then ran a gristmill near 
  Coal Centre for several years. On July 27, 1851, he was united in 
  marriage with Sarah Robison, who was born November 9, 1830, in West 
  Pike Run township, Washington Co., Penn., a daughter of Hiram Robison,
  who was born August 19, 1804, and when a young man was married to Sarah
  Zook, who was born June 22, 1803. They were the parents of twelve 
  children, viz.: Thomas, Tyre, Sarah (Mrs. Duvall), Salem, Isaiah, 
  Hannah (wife of Mark Eagye), John, John (deceased), Eliza (deceased),
  and three who died in infancy. The father, who was a farmer, died 
  September 23, 1890; the mother was laid to rest November 24, 1882; 
  both were members of the M. E. Church, and in politics he was a 
  Democrat. To the union of Jefferson P. and Sarah  (Robison) Duvall 
  the following children have been born: Thomas; Jane, wife of Allen J.
  White; Melissa, wife of John B. Carson; Jacob; Hiram; Ellsworth, 
  and Harrison and Jefferson (twins). Mr. Duvall owns a good farm 
  of one hundred acres, with good improvements thereon, and the place 
  among the old settlers is known as the old Bedall homestead. Mr. 
  Duvall owns 186 acres in another tract in East Pike Run township.
  In politics he is a Republican, and has served as school director. 
  He is a charter member of the F. & A. M. Lodge, No. 461, Coal Centre, 
  and holds the office of junior warden; his first membership in the 
  Fraternity was in 1862 at Brownsville, Penn. He and his wife are
  members of the M. E. Church. 
 
Louis Duvall, p. 502
  LOUIS DUVALL, one of the most substantial farmers of Hopewell township, 
  was the youngest son of Louis, who was a son of Alexander and Abigail 
  Duvall. Alexander Duvall came from France to America at an early day,
  and first located east of the mountains, afterward removing to Fayette 
  county, Penn., near the Monongahela river, where the remainder of his 
  days were passed. 

  Louis Duvall received a common-school education, and after his marriage,
  to Hannah McAdams, removed to Still Water, Ohio, then almost an unbroken 
  wilderness. They were in constant dread of the Indians, and when 
  her husband was obliged to leave home to go to mill the wife would
  hide herself and children until his return. Mr. Duvall contracted 
  malaria while in Ohio, and returned to Washington county to regain his
  health. No house being ready for them on their return, they lived for 
  a time in a barn, which was remodeled and fitted up for the purpose.
  But though living to a goodly age, Mr. Duvall never regained his health, 
  and upon the devoted wife and mother fell the heavy weight of providing 
  and caring for the needs of the family. She often found it necessary 
  to take her infant to the field, leaving it in a corner of the fence 
  while she hoed corn. By their united efforts, in spite of the husband's 
  poor health, they were successful and accumulated considerable property. 
  Of the nine children born to them, only three are now living, viz.: Hannah 
  (widow of Elias Garrett, of West Bethlehem township), Abigail (wife 
  of Jacob Deems, now residing in West Pike Run township, this county)
  and Louis. Mary, Eliza, Jane, Maria, Isabel and John are deceased.
  The father and mother were members of the Society of Friends, being 
  regular attendants at the services, though the meeting house was five
  miles distant.  

  Louis Duvall was born in 1830, in East Pike Run township, this county, 
  and was reared on the home farm. Owing to the feeble health of his father
  the bulk of the farm work fell upon the boys as soon as they were old 
  enough to be of use. In the summer time he could not attend school, 
  and through the winter, school lasted but three months. All farm
  work was done by hand in those days. Grain was cut with sickles 
  or cradles, as there were no threshing machine; it was then beaten 
  out with flails or trampled out with horses, being afterward cleaned 
  in a fanning-mill. The winter season was the time for doing such
  work, and as the process was long and tedious, the opportunities
  for getting an education were very limited. The schools of that time
  were very primitive affairs compared with those of today, and speaking 
  of them Mr. Duvall said: "I wonder that we got any education. If the 
  children of today could see with what difficulties we had to contend,
  they would better appreciate the advantages of the present school 
  system. The school-house I attended was as good as the times afforded.
  It was built of hewn logs, and had windows of four small panes each. The
  seats were slabs, into which wooden pegs were driven for legs. There were 
  no backs or desks. Around the sides of the room holes were bored into 
  which long wooden pins were driven. On these pins boards were fastened, 
  forming a writing desk. The ceiling was low and liberally festooned with
  cobwebs. No maps or charts were used to help the youngsters with their 
  lessons. Into a room of this kind fifty or sixty pupils were crowded. 
  The teachers were men of muscle as well as brains, and believed 
  in the efficacy of the rod." Mr. Duvall attended school whenever 
  possible until he was sixteen or eighteen years of age, then turned 
  his attention entirely to farming, working his father's place. 

  In 1853 he was married to Mary Deems, a native of Clarksville, Greene Co., 
  Penn., daughter of John and Mary (Reynolds) Deems, the former being a 
  native of Washington county, and the latter born in Fayette county, 
  Penn. To Mr. and Mrs. Duvall have been born eleven children, as follows:
  John R., Hannah M., Annie M., San Jacinto, William L., Mary Olive,
  Ulysses G. and Schuyler C. (twins), Lurilla (deceased), W. Claud and
  Dot Dell. They continued to reside in East Pike Run township until 1879, 
  when Mr. Duvall purchased a farm of 163 acres in Hopewell township, 
  where he has been engaged in farming and wool growing, being ably assisted
  by his sons, none of whom are married. Two of the daughters are married:
  Hannah (to John Barnes, residing in Claysville, this county) and San 
  Jacinto (married to Albert Rush, living in Hopewell township, this county).
  Mr. Duvall has endeavored to give each of his children as good an education
  as possible. His twin sons are attending college at Ada, Ohio. In politics
  he is a Republican, and in religion he and his wife are members of
  Buffalo Presbyterian Church. 

 John B. Carson, p. 1448
  JOHN B. CARSON. The Carson family have for many years been prominently
  associated with the leading citizens of Washington county. Thomas 
  Carson was born in eastern Pennsylvania, and coming to Washington 
  county many years ago, was married to Mary Gibson, a native of Kentucky.
  They settled on the farm in Fallowfield township, which is yet owned by
  their descendants, and he also followed shoemaking, also serving
  many years as justice of the peace. At one time he was pursued by the 
  Indians, and traveled seventy-five miles in one day, carrying his rifle,
  and thus escaped. He died in 1848, leaving the following children:
  Elizabeth (wife of James Young), Thomas G., Mary (Mrs. Grable), 
  James S., John B., Ann (Mrs. Grable) and Charlotte (wife of John 
  Carson).

  John B. Carson was born in 1802, on the old place on Pigeon creek, 
  in Fallowfield township, Washington county, where he grew to manhood 
  and received a district-school education. When a young man he was married
  to Sarah Scott, who was born in 1813, in Fallowfield township. The young 
  couple first settled on a farm on Pigeon creek, and in 1846 moved to 
  the homestead of 140 acres where their children are yet living. 
  Mr. Carson voted with the Democratic party, serving in various offices, 
  and in religion Mrs. Carson was a member of the Baptist Church. 
  He died January 27, 1872, and September 17, 1887, his wife was laid beside
  him. Their children were born as follows: Newton (who was a real-estate 
  dealer and founder of West Belle Vernon, deceased December 24, 1888), 
  Mary (wife of Jackson Carson, of Fallowfield township), Smith (a farmer,
  living on Pigeon creek), Lewis (living in West Pike Run township), 
  John B. (residing in Allen township), Jerome G., and Sarah J. (deceased).

  John B. Carson, son of John B. and Sarah (Scott) Carson, was born in 
  1848, in Fallowfield township, Washington county. He attended the schools 
  of the county, afterward went to the Southwestern State Normal School at 
  California, and afterward taught five terms near the home neighborhood. 
  In 1874 he was united in marriage with Melissa Duvall, a native of 
  East Pike Run township, this county, a daughter of J. P. and  Sarah (Robison) 
  Duvall, the father born in East Bethlehem township, and the mother a
  native of Washington county; both parents are now living in East Pike
  Run township. After his marriage John B. Carson located on the 130 acres
  in Fallowfield township, where he is now living. In 1874 he erected a
  good house, and in 1881 built a new barn. He is a prosperous farmer; 
  in politics he votes the Democratic ticket. Mr. and Mrs. Carson are 
  members of the Zion Disciple church, in which he serves as an elder. They
  are the parents of six children, namely: Bertha L., Val C., Sarah Mabel,
  John Parker, Viola Isabelle and Jefferson P.  

Jackson and Alexander S. Carson, p. 395
  CARSON, JACKSON and ALEXANDER S. The Carson family have for many years
  been prominently identified with the leading citizens of Washington
  county, and a record of the ancestry of the gentlemen, whose names 
  introduce this sketch, will be found at page 1268 in this volume.  

  Thomas G. Carson was born, about the year 1792, on the home farm in 
  Fallowfield township, Washington county, and received his education in 
  the county schools. In early life he married Elizabeth Scott, a daughter 
  of Parker and Sarah (Carson) Scott, natives of the county, and who lived 
  on a farm in Fallowfield township. They had a family of one  son and twelve 
  daughters, one of whom, Lucy Ann, is yet living, near West Belle
  Vernon, the wife of John Sphar. The children born to Thomas G. Carson 
  were Thomas, Parker, Lucy Ann, Charlotte, Sarah, Washington, Jackson, John
  and Alexander S. Thomas G. Carson was an ardent Democrat, and in religious 
  faith he and his wife were members of the Baptist Church. They passed
  their lives on the old place where Mrs. Carson died in 1858. Mr. Carson 
  was then married to Esther McIlvaine, a native of Somerset township, 
  this county. He died in 1880, having passed his eighty-fourth year.
  The following children were born to his first marriage: Thomas 
   (who died near Rushville, Ind.), Charlotte, wife of Joseph Rider (in 
  Fallowfield township), Parker; Washington; Jackson; John, in East Pike 
  Run township; Lucy Ann; Sarah (unmarried) and Alexander S. 

  JACKSON CARSON was born April 3, 1827, on the old homestead in Fallowfield
  township, Washington Co., Penn., and received a subscription
  -school education. On October 3, 1852, he was united in marriage 
  with Mary, daughter of John B. and Sarah (Scott) Carson, special 
  mention of whom will be found at page 1268. After his marriage
  Mr. Carson settled on the 140 acres in Fallowfield township which 
  is now his home, running in debt for same; he also owns 139 1/2 acres
  in East Pike Run township. He has made many improvements on both farms,
  and has erected fine residences and three barns on his land. This fine
  property is the fruit of patient toil and ceaseless industry. He takes
  some interest in politics, voting with the Democratic party, and has
  filled  many township offices. Three sons have been born to Mr. and
  Mrs. Carson, namely: William Henry, deceased at the age of twelve 
  years; Isaac Newton, married and living in East Pike Run township, 
  and John Wesley, a widower, living at home. 

  ALEXANDER S. CARSON was born May 10, 1838, on the homestead in Fallowfield
  township, where he now resides, and was educated in the schools
  of his district. In December, 1871, he was married to Annette, daughter of
  Henry and Emily (Duvall) Hanan, all three being natives of East Pike 
  Run township, this county, where the marriage took place. Her father died
  in 1868, and her mother in February, 1892. Mr. and Mrs. Carson began wedded
  life on the farm of 130 (now 206) acres in Fallowfield township, 
  where she died in November, 1880, leaving one son, Walter. In 1882 Mr.
  Carson married Elizabeth Myers, a native of Somerset township, this county,
  daughter of John and Mary (Ross) Myers, who were born in Germany, 
  and about the year 1854 came to America, locating in Washington 
  county, where both died. To this union four children have been born, namely:
  Jesse, Frederick Ross, Harry Fell, and Elmer Clarence. Mr. Carson's farm 
  is well conducted, and on it, in addition to general agriculture, 
  he raises a fine grade of Short-horn Jersey cattle. Politically 
  he votes with the Democratic party, and he has held local offices; Mrs. 
  Carson is a member of the Presbyterian Church at Pigeon Creek. 

George R. Deems, p. 1188
  GEORGE R. DEEMS, a successful farmer of West Pike Run township, 
  is a native of the same, born October 3, 1841, on the old homestead.
  The father, John Deems, was also a native of the county, and here learned
  the carpenter and wagon-making trades. When a young man he was married to
  Mary Reynolds, a native of Fayette county, Penn., who bore him nine children,
  namely: Mary, wife of Lewis Duvall, a farmer of Hopewell township, 
  Washington Co., Penn.; Martha, widow of Nickson Ailes, a resident 
  of California, Penn.; Sarah J., widow of S. W. Rogers, of Beallsville,
  Penn.; George R., whose name opens this sketch; Margaret E., wife of 
  Robert Elwood, a resident of Beallsville; Cornelia, married to John D.
  Springle, a boat builder of Brownsville, Penn.; Frank, living in Ottumwa, 
  Iowa; Elizabeth and Jacob R., both deceased. The father died soon after
  the birth of his youngest child; his widow is now living, at the age of
  seventy-seven years, with her daughter, Mrs. Rogers, in the village of
  Beallsville. 

  George R. Deems was reared in the West Pike run township, where he
  received a common-school education, and when seventeen years old learned
  the cabinet-maker's trade. In 1861 he enlisted in Company I, Eighth
  P. V. I., and participated in the Seven Days' Fight, the second
  battle of Bull Run, Fredericksburg, the Wilderness, and numerous 
  other engagements. He served until the close of the war, then returning 
  to Washington county followed his trade about five years in West Brownsville. 
  On November 25, 1869, he was united in marriage with Emma E. Rogers, 
  who was born December 12, 1846, in Washington county, Penn., a daughter 
  of Samuel and Sarah F. (Crawford) Rogers, natives of Maryland, and the 
  parents of children, as follows: Priscilla, wife of Adah Crouch, a 
  farmer of West Pike Run township; Joseph H, a farmer of Beallsville, 
  Washington county; Sarah F., married to Smith F. Scott; Emma E.,
  wife of George Deems; Mary A., deceased; and four who died in infancy. 
  The father of this family was a public- spirited citizen, and a successful
  agriculturist. He died in 1890 having been preceded to the grave by 
  his wife in 1882. Both were members of the M. E. Church, and in politics
  he was a Republican.

  After their marriage George R. and Emma E. (Rogers) Deems located on
  the pleasant farm in West Pike Run township which is now their home. It 
  contains seventy-three acres of valuable, well cultivated land, to 
  which Mr. Deems devotes the greater portion of his time. He is identified
  with the Republican party in politics, and is deeply interested
  in all public matters. Mr. and Mrs. Deems are members of the Beallsville
  M. E. Church. 




   
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