The Kelley newsletter part 4



	The 1940 Reunion
	The reunion will be held this year in Washington Park, Washington, Pa. I have 
not learned the arrangements aout the dinner but I suppose it will be the usual clan 
dinner. Bring your own cups, plates and silverware. Also bring lots of victuals (excuse 
me for trying to be funny). I have received the following letter from clan president 
William Lynn Kelley:- "We have had reserved for the Kelley reunion on September 
first the use of a new shelter just being completed in Washington Park. This 
shelter is just to the left after entering the park gates. The first road to the 
left leads up to it and it is easily seen from the entrance. We think that there 
will be ample room here and that it is an ideal place for the dinner and the meeting." 
Hot coffee will be furnished. Bring your own coffee pots.	Many Thanks.
	The historian appreciates more than tongue can tell the twenty five dollars 
given by the clan for helping the magazine work. The printing and the postage 
amount to about six dollars on each issue. This is the third issue since the 1939 
reunion so I have about six dollars on hand now.
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THE KELLEY CLAN MAGAZINE
PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY: JAMES O. STEWART,
R.F.D.NO1, BOX 102, BROWNSVILLE,PA
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Number Thirteen Christmas 1940. Free and worth it.
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In Memory Of Adam Robert Rush With feelings of profound sorrow your historian records the departure from this life of Rev. Adam Robert Rush. At nine in the morning of the day before his death he suddenly became very ill with heart trouble. His wife had to go to a neighbor's home for help. The physcian who was called saw that the end was close. Rev. Rush died at three o'clock in the morning of Friday, November 22, 1940. His wife, his daughter, and Alfred Murphy were at the bedside when the end came. The funeral services were held the following Monday in the Hewitt Presbyterian Church of Rices Landing. Rev. John Wesley Shell, pastor of Christ Methodist Church of Uniontown, conducted the services. Ten members of the conference were present. Burial was in the Hewitt Cemetery. Adam Robert Rush was born September 27, 1859 on his father's farm near Jefferson, Pa. He prepared by correspondence courses for the ministry. He was received into the Pittsburgh Conference of the Methodist Protestant Church, February, 1888. His first charge was in Union Circuit in Greene County, Pa. His other charges, named in order, were Trumbul Circuit, Trumbull County, Ohio; Stahlstown, in Westmoreland County, Pa.; Dunbar, in Fayette County, Pa.; Mahaffey, in Clearfield County, Pa.; Rogersville, in Green County, Pa.; Bakerstown, in Allegheny County, Pa.; Belle Bridge and Coal Bluff, below Elizabeth, Pa.; Turnersville, Pa.; Roseville, Ohio; Nettle Hill in Greene County, Pa.; Brookville, in Jefferson County, Pa.; and Amity, Pa. The Stahlstown parsonage in Westmoreland County was erected during his pastorate. He organized the Deer Creek Church on the Bakerstown Charge in Allegheny County. After thirty-five years of active service he took a superannuated relation to the Conference in 1924. He was a member of the Odd Fellows. In 1881 Adam R. Rush wsa united in marriage to Miss Martha Ellen Crago. She was born November 5, 1861 on her father's farm near Rices Landing. She was a daughter of Joseph and Maria (Thomas) Crago. Adam and Martha had two daughters, Minnie Ellen Rush and Gertrude Glenn Rush. Minnie Ellen Rush was born June 15, 1885 on the farm of Jacob Strawn Rush near Jefferson, Pa. She attended the South Western State Normal School in California, Pa. for three years, 1901 to 1904. She is a member of the Rebekahs. She married William Daniel Loos of California, Pa. He is a painter and interior decorator. He is a member of the Jr. O.U.A.M. Mr. and Mrs. Loos are members of the Presbyterian Church. They have had three children, all born in California, Pa. Robert Nathaniel Loos (born January 14, 1906 - died July 8, 1906) is buried in Hewitt Cemetery in Rices Landing. Marian Elizabeth Loos (born May 31, 1908 - died the same day) is buried in Hewitt Cemetery. Martha Fern Loos, the third child, is a graduate of East Pike Run High School in Washington County, in the class of 1939. She is now a student, will be a Junior this fall, in the State Teachers' College in California, Pa. Gertrude Glenn Rush, the second daughter of Adam and Martha, was born January 9, 1889 in Jacktown, Greene County, Pa. She died of pneumonia, December 9, 1893. She is buried in the Hewitt Cemetery. Mrs. Martha Ellen (Crago) Rush died August 3, 1926. She is buried in the Hewitt Cemetery. After the death of his first wife Rev. Rush married Miss Winifred Murphy of near Perryopolis, Pa. They made their home with Mr. Alfred Murphy in the old Murphy homestead. They had no children. Let us go back into history. Our ancestor, William Kelley Senior, had nine children, so far as your historian has learned, one of these nine was William Kelley Junior, born January 13, 1804. He was a farmer for awhile and lived for awhile in Indiana but most of his life he kept a hotel in Jefferson, Pa. He married Elizabeth Ewart. This Elizabeth and her sister started from Ireland to come to this country and the sister died on the way. William Kelley, Junior, and his wife were the parents of eight children, as follows:- James Kelley, born August 13, 1827, died November 26, 1893, married Martha Craft, born March 11, 1835, died November 17, 1890; Jane Ann Kelley, twin of James, died at age of two years, eight months and eleven days; Charlotte Kelley married Jacob Strawn Rush; Ewart Kelley, married the widow of John Kerns; Elizabeth Jane Kelley, died single, aged about forty-five; Mary Ann Kelley, married Richard Young, they moved to McKeesport; William Kelley died July 13, 1855 aged twenty-two years, four months and fourteen days; and Robert Kelley, died April 19, 1851 aged ten years and twenty days. Jacob Strawn Rush was born March 1, 1821 and died September 24, 1880. His wife Charlotte (Kelley) Rush died in 1898 at about seventy years of age. They are buried in the Cumberland Presbyterian Cemetery in Jefferson. They had eight children as follows:- 1. Hannah Rush, born Maarch 29, 1846, married Hiram Haver m in 1867. They lived at Inconium, Iowa, for many years. Then they home-steaded a quarter of land a half mile west of Bonesteel, N.D. He died in 1912, She died in her seventy-seventh year. They had seven girls, all of whom with their husbands and families are living in or near Bonesteel. 2. Elizabeth Rush died at age of about five. (to be continued in next magazine)
The 1941 Reunion will be held SUNDAY, AUGUST 31, in the Log Cabin in Washington Park, Wash., Pa.
THE KELLEY CLAN MAGAZINE
PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY: JAMES O. STEWART,
R.F.D.NO1, BOX 102, BROWNSVILLE,PA
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Number Fourteen EASTER 1941. Free and worth it.
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In Memory of Adam Robert Rush (concluded) In the last magazinewe started to tell about the eight children of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob S. Rush. We continue:- 3. William Alexander Rush was born March 2, 1850. He was a graduate of the college in Jefferson. He taught sidtrict schools in Greene County for twelve years. In 1881 he entered the Methodist Protes-tant ministry, being assigned to the Hollidaysburg charge. Then his appointments were:- Trumbull Circuit in Trumbull County, Ohio; Eldersville Circuit and Bethel Circuit in Washington County, Pa.; Nessly and Point Pleasant in Hancock County, West Va.; Broad Ford in Fayette County, Pa.; Monongahela Circuit in Greene County, Pa.; Second Church in Uniontown, Pa.; Bakerstown, Pa.; Nettle Hill Circuit in Greene County, Pa.; and Union Circuit in Greene County, Pa. For eleven years he was conference treasurer. He took a superannuated relation to the coinference in 1911 and went to Morrisville, Greene County, Pa., where he died Nov. 16, 1925. He is buried in Jefferson in the new cemetery. He was a member of the Odd Fellows. He married Matilda McDougal, born August 6, 1850. They had three chidlren. 4. Harriet Rush, born Oct. 16, 1852, died September 4, 1853. 5. Martha Jane Rush was born July 23, 1854. She attended Monongahela College, in Jefferson, Pa. She married John Wesley Gregg, who had been a student at Monongahela College and at Waynesburg College. He taught district schools for about seventeen years. They had five children. 6. James Franklin Rush, known as Frank Rush, was born September 24 (or 28), 1856. He went west at age of agout twenty. He was married twice. His children and grandchildren are living in or near Wilton Junciton, Iowa. 7. Adam Robert Rush in whose memory this magazine and magazint number thirteen are issued. 8. Sarah Louisa Rush was born August 25, 1863 on her father's farm near Jefferson. She married James William Crago, born March 2, 1862, farmer near Rices Landing. She died February 12, 1936. James and Sarah had eleven children.
THE KELLEY CLAN MAGAZINE
PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY: JAMES O. STEWART,
R.F.D.NO1, BOX 102, BROWNSVILLE, PA
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Number Fifteen JULY 14, 1941. Free and worth it.
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THE 1940 REUNION The 1940 reunion of the Kelley Clan was held on the Sunday before Labor Day in Washington Park, Washington, Pa., in the new pavilion at the left of the park entrance. Mrs. John Mills Cowan of Carmichaels, born July 23, 1854, was the oldest person present. At the business session it was decided to have the 1941 reunion in the same park on the Sunday before Labor Day. The following officers were elected for the coming year:- President, Ulysses Grant Kelley Vice Pres., Winnett Hughes Kelley Secretary, Mrs. George T. Kelley Treasurer, George T. Kelley It was voted they give the historian ten dollars to help him publish THE KELLEY CLAN MAGAZINE. The historian was duly grateful and said so. Mrs. Z.B. Zimmerman and Mrs. John Olinger were called on for speeches as this was their first reunion. They replied with a few appropriate remakrs. Brief addresses were made by Rev. Adam R. Rush and James Edward Kelley. The following one hindred twenty clan members registered at the 1940 reunion:- NOTES The 1941 reunion of the Kelley Clan will be held Sunday, August 31, at the log cabin in Washington Park, Washington, Pa. It you have never been there, see lower half of right hand column of magazine number six. Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Rush of Smithton, Pa. are the parents of a new girl who arrived January 16, 1940. They have named her Brenda May Rush. Kenneth Rush is a grandson of Rev. William Rush. See magazine number fourteen. On the first day of May your historian called at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Alvie Earl Kelley near Eighty Four in Washington County. They are announcing the marriage of their daughter, Grace Lucille Kelley, to Rea Linn Hartley son of Mrs. Sadie Hartley, of Laboratory. The marriage was performed in Winchester, Va. on April 5, 1941, by Rev. Robert A. Whitten, pastor of the Winchester Christian Church. After the ceremony the couple left for Wooster, Ohio, where Mr. Hartley is in his senior year at Wooster College. Alvie Kelley's oldest son, Joseph E. Kelley, is building a new house on his father's farm near Eighty Four. Lloyd Munce Kelley plays the saxophone and clarinet in the Canonsburg High School Band. He is a son of our vice president, Winnett Kelley. Jack M. Lehner, who is a graduate of Trinity Hall High School, is an enthusiastic amateur radio operator. He has a back room in the house all to himself and has it filled with complicated contraptions. His number is W 8 U S Z. He will be glad to hear from other radio operators. His postoffice address is Box 5, Wolfdale, Pa. Mr. and Mrs. Lon M. Conklin, of Sycamore, are announcing the marriage of their daughter, Miss Betty Jane Conklin, to Harley Pearson, son of Mrs. Lemen Wise, also of Sycamore. They were married at Washington, Pa., September 12, 1940. The bride was a Junior in Nineveh High School. Mr. Pearsln is a prominent farmer near Sycamore. On October 22, 1940, John Edwin Teagarden, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Teagarden of Rices Landing, celebrated his eleventh birthday with sixty-five guests present. He received many fine gifts. Our ancestor William Kelley, Senior, died July 14, 1841. In his memory this magazine is dated July 14, 1941. To save on postage this magazine is mailed in the same envelope with magazines thirteen and fourteen. Charles E. Kelley of Iowa, Mrs. John Olinger, Charles A. Kelley, Alvie Earl Kelley, Benjamin Adam Kelley and Charles Percy Kelley have contributed money to help pay the postage on these magazines.
THE KELLEY CLAN MAGAZINE
PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY: JAMES O. STEWART,
R.F.D.NO1, BOX 102, BROWNSVILLE,PA
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Number Sixteen THANKSGIVING 1941. Free and worth it.
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(picture-unavailable) The above illustrated article appeared in The Conneaut News-Herald of Conneaut, Ohio, Saturday, October 11, 1941. By courtesy of the editor of The News- Herald we reproduced the article here. Miss Mary Elizabeth Kelley is a daughter of William Wallace Kelley and Montie Estella (Reed) Kelley. William Wallace Kelley is one ofthe eight sons of William Kelley and Nancy M. (Sharp) Kelley. This William Kelley was a son of Samuel Force Kelley and Ailse (Carter) Kelley. Samuel Force Kelley was a son of our ancestor William Kelley, Senior.
THE KELLEY CLAN MAGAZINE
PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY: JAMES O. STEWART,
R.F.D.NO1, BOX 102, BROWNSVILLE, PA
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Number Seventeen CHRISTMAS 1941. Free and worth it.
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THE 1941 REUNION The 1941 reunion of the Kelley Clan was held on the Sunday before Labor Day at the log cabin in Washington Park, Washington, Pa. At the business session in the afternoon the members voted to give the historian, James O. Stewart, twenty dollars to help him in publishing this magazine. The historian appreciates this assistance very accepted her resignation as she has been secretary for at least ten reunions. Jack Lehner, Jr. entertained us so well and impressed us so favorably with his electric appratus that he was elected to an office. The historian made a brief speech is which he said that he would like to have next year's reunion held in same building with a stage so we could have an entertainment and asked if we could have a committee appointed to find a suitable place for the reunion. A motion to that effect was passed. President Grant Kelley appointed James O. Stewart, Winnett Kelley and Jack Lehner, Jr. as a committee of three to select a place for the 1942 reunion. The following officers were elected for the coming year:- President, Winnett Hughes Kelley; Vice President, Ralph Christopher; Second Vice President, Jack Lehner, Jr.; Treasurer, George T. Kelley. Secretary, Mary Stewart Kelley.
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The following one hundred forty seven clan members registered at the 1941 reunion:- This was the first reunion for the Feldman, the Charles Gustava Kelley, the Confer, the Snodgrass, the Carnes and the Thomas families. Three young married couples graced the occasion by their presence. They were: Mr. and Mrs. W.J. Van Ryn of Wilkinsburg; Mr. and Mrs. Rea Heartley of Nutwood, Ohio; and Mr. and Mrs. Harold Smith of Washington, Pa. Mrs. Van Ryn will be remebered as Malva Bowser. Mrs. Hartley and Mrs. Smith are daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Alvie Earl Kelley. Mr. Hartley will teach Chemistry and Mathematics in the Fowler Township High School near Warren, Ohio.
THE KELLEY CLAN MAGAZINE
PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY: JAMES O. STEWART,
R.F.D.NO1, BOX 102, BROWNSVILLE,PA
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Number Eighteen Good Friday 1941. Free and worth it.
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William Isaac Grimm This infant was born November 10, 1937 at the Grimm home near Washington, Pa. He died in the Washington hospital February 12, 1938. He was buried in the cemetery in Amity, Pa. He is survived by his parents and one little brother, Carl Imas Grimm. William Isaac Grimm was the son of Carl Iams Grimm and Althea Irene (Kelley Grimm. Mrs. Grimm is a daughter of Isaac Woverton Kelley and Minnie Viola (Bristor) Kelley. (See magazine number three).
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Walter Ernest Neel Walter Ernest Neel died April 6, 1937 at his home in Wilkinsburg, Pa. Burial was in the New Cemetery of Jefferson, Pa. He was born April 9, 1893 in Jefferson. He was a graduate of the Jefferson High School in the class of 1913. He taught for three years in the district school (afterwards consilidated) of Jefferson. Then he went for two years to Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pa. He went into training at Carnegie Tech in Pittsburgh, Pa. and was to go overseas on November 12, 1918 but the armistice was signed on Nov. 11. After college he worked with Midvale Steel in Coatsville, near Philadelphia. He leaves his wife who was Maud Lilian Livingston of Wilkinsburg, Pa. He was preceded in death by an infant son. Walter Ernest Neel was a son of John Cotteral Neel and Olive Cary (Gwynne) Neel. John Cotteral Neel was a son of James Neel and Charlotte (Cumpson) Neel. This James Neel was a son of James Neel and Eliza (Kelley) Neel. Eliza Kelley was a daughter of of our ancestor William Kelley, Senior.
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James Howard Kelley When the limb on which he was picking cherries gave way James Howard Kelley of Morgantown, West Virginia, fell several feet to a concrete wall and was killed instantly at 8:40 p.m., Thursday, June 19, 1941. He was rushed to the hospital but death had resulted from a crushed skull. He was born April 1, 1881 in Easton, West Virginia. On September 2, 1903 he married Florence Utt of Morgantown, West Virginia. He leaves his wife, Mrs. Florence Kelley; a son, Gordon Kelley of Springfield, Ohio, and a daughter, Mrs. Olive Kelley Martin of Baltimore, Md. He is also survived by the following brothers and sisters:-- Charles Gustava Kelley of Lockport, Ill.; Zeddie Samuel Kelley of Lancaster, Pa.; Mrs. W.E. Shriver of Morgantown, West Va.; Mrs. O.M. Everly of Star City, West Va.; Mrs Jane Headlee of Wilmerding, Pa.; and Mrs. C.D. Carnes of Baltimore, Md. He was a member of the Spruce Street Christian Church in Morgantown and was a deacon for many years. He worked in steel mills most of his life. He was a member of the Odd Fellows and ther men of this lodge were in charge of the funeral services in the Davidson Funeral Home. Burial was in East Oak Grove Cemetery in Morgantown. James Howard Kelley was a son of Samuel Franklin Kelley and Ansadonna (Johnson) Kelley. Samuel Franklin Kelley was a son of Samuel Force Kelley and Ailse (Carter) Kelley. Samuel Force Kelley was a son of our ancestor William Kelley, Senior.
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Baxter Lorraine Olinger At the age of almost sixteen Baxter Lorraine Olinger died February 19, 1940 of rheumatic fever. Baxter was in the second year of high school, in which he had led his class since his entrance. Two years earlier he was best in the county test of over three hundred students. He was talented in music and art. He leaves his parents, who reside in West Laayette, Ohio. He is also survived by two brothers and two sisters:-- Keith Olinger, Bruce Olinger, Eva Rose Olinger and Carma Grace Olinger. Baxter Lorraine Olinger was the son of Clyde and Maybelle Olinger. Clyde Olinger is the son of John Olinger (died May 12, 1940 of a heart attack) and Minnie Florence (Everhart) Olinger. Mrs. John Olinger is a daughter of Zachary Taylor Everhart and Sarah Jane (Gardner) Everhart. Sarah Jane Gardner was a daughter of George Gardner and Elizabeth (Crago) Cardner. Elizabeth Crago was one of the six children of Charles Crago and Sarah (Kelley) Crago. Sarah Kelley was a daughter of our ancestor William Kelley, Senior.
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Mrs. James Edward Kelley After an illness of about three months Mrs. Laura (Porter) Kelley died at 2:30 in the afternoon of October 15, 1941 in the Kelley homestead near Jefferson, Pa. Her last trip from the home was to the Kelley reunion. She was born March 10, 1876 at New Holland, Ohio. She was a graduate of the Music Department of Ohio Northern University at Ada, Ohio, and of the Columbus Conservatory of Music. James Edward Kelley and Laura Porter were graduated from Ohio Northern University in the same year, 1904. They became acquainted there and the friendship proved to be more than a passing fancy. They were united in marriage September 12, 1911. She taught in the public schools of Ohio and later taught music. She was a member of the Eastern Star Lodge, the Dames of Malta, the Ladies' Auxillary of Sons of Union Veterans and the Rebekah Lodge. She was preceeded in death by an infant son, Porter Freeman Kelley, who was born May 26, 1913, died the same day and was buried in the New Holland Cemetery. Surviving, in addition to her husband, are one sister, Miss Anna Porter of Chillicothe, Ohio, and one nephew, Harold Porter of Poughkeepsie, N.Y. In the evening of the Friday after her death, relatives and friends met in the Hogue and Garrison Funeral Home in Waynesburg and a prayer service was conducted by Rev. I.N. Crooks, pastor of Muddy Creek Presbyterian Church. The next day the body was taken to the New Holland Methodist church of which she had been a member since childhood. Services were conducted by the pastor, Rev. V.C. Stump. His text was part of the fourth verse of the thirty ninth Psalm, "Lord, make me to know mine end." Burial was in the New Holland Cemetery. Mrs. Kelley was a member of our clan by marriage. Her husband, James Edward Kelley is a son of Freeman Kelley and Mary Ann (Sharpnack) Kelley. This Freeman Kelley was a son of Samuel Force Kelley and Ailse (Carter) Kelley. Samuel Force Kelley was a son of our ancestor William Kelley, Senior.
THE KELLEY CLAN MAGAZINE
PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY: JAMES O. STEWART,
R.F.D.NO1, BOX 102, BROWNSVILLE,PA
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Number Nineteen August 25, 1942. Free and worth it.
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The 1942 Reunion will be held on the Sunday before Labor Day at the large, old pavilion in Washington Park, Washington, Pa.
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Mrs. Laura G. Nichols Mrs. Laura Gilbreth Nichols died at 11:30 P.M., April 23, 1942 at her home in Jefferson, Pa. She was born April 22, 1863 in Jefferson and spent her entire life in that community. She married Joshua Martin Nichols, who was born April 16, 1862, died May 22, 1933. She was preceded in death by one daughter, Mrs. Fannie Charlotte Hegendeffer, born January 14, 1893, died October 4, 1929. Mrs. Nichols is survived by two sons, Howard Ray Nichols and James Neel Nichols, both of Jefferson; by two sisters, Miss Sadie Neel and Miss Anna Neel, both of Jefferson; and by three grandchildren, Ernest Hegendeffer, James Neel Nichols, Jr and Mary Marie Nichols, all of Jefferson. She was a member of the Jefferson Presbyterian Church. Burial was in the Jefferson Cemetery. Mrs. Nichols was one of the twelve children of James Neel and Charlotte (Cumpson) Neel. This James Neel was a son of James Neel and Eliza (Kelley) Neel. Eliza Kelley was a daughter of our ancestor William Kelley, Senior. Shirley Louise Davis An accident Thursday, August 22, 1940 claimed the life of a child of our clan. Shirley Louise Davis, little daughter of Charles R. Davis, a W.P.A. worker if Uffington, West Va., was fatally scalded. Her mother was preparing to cold-pack some vegetables and had removed the boiling water from the stove to the floor. While her attention was diverted the child backed into the tub and toppled into the scalding water. The accident occurred about seven in the evening. A phiscial was summoned and after a preliminary examination ordered the child to Monongahela General Hospital where she died the following day, August 23, 1940, at four in the morning. Funeral services were conducted at the home and at the Halleck church. The pallbearers were Howard Edward Kelley, Walter Davis, Gerald Hardin and Robert Carpeneter. The minister was Rev. L.L. Lightner, a Baptist minister of near Morgantown. Twelve little girls dressed in white, each carrying a large basket of flowers, served as a guard of honor at the home and at the church. Burial was in the Halleck cemetery. As the funeral was the same day as the Kelley-Smith reunion at Brown Chapel the attendance at the reunion was very small. Besides her parents Shirley is survived by a little sister, Evelyn Lois Davis and a little brother, Charles Russell Davis, Jr. Shirley Louise Davis, born March 18, 1936, was the daughter of Charles Russell Davis and Evelyn Ruth (Smith) Davis. Mrs. Davis is the daughter of Elza Ray Smith and Ora Delila (Vanata) Smith. Elza Ray Smith is a son of Riley Elwood Smith and Mary Eleanor (Kelley) Smith. Mary Eleanor Kelley was a daughter of James Kelley and Mary J. (Bixler) Kelley. This James Kelley was a son of Freeman Kelley and Mary (Ailes) Kelley. This Freeman Kelley was a son of our ancestor William Kelley, Senior.
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"Grandma" Rush The following obituary notive of Mrs. Frank Rush (see magazine number fourteen) is taken, slightly shortened, from the Wilton Advocate, of Wilton Junction (also called Wilton), Iowa:--Our good and kindly neighbor, "Grandma" Rush has been called to her eternal rest. She passed away at her home at 2:45 a.m., Saturday, October 7, 1939 after sufferinga stroke of paralysis on August 18, the day following her eightieth birthday. The Sunday preceding her death, her children, grand-children and other relatives had held a wonderful birthday party for Grandma, possibly one of the brightest spots in her long and cheerful life. Sarah Elizabeth Johnston, was born August 17, 1859 in Tipton, Iowa, the daughter of Gilbert and Catherine Johnston, who were among the earliest of Cedar County's pioneers. She grew to womanhood in Cedar County and on January 25, 1883, she was married to James Franklin Rush. They lived in Cedar County for a number of years and then moved to Wilton, twenty-five years ago. Mrs. Rush was a member of the local Presbyterian Church. Surviving are three daughters, Mrs. Ernest of West Liberty, Mrs. Bert Gill and and Mrs. Louis Marlof of Cedar County; one brother, S.R. Johnston of Cedar County; two sisters, Mrs. T.M. Smith of Cedar County and Mrs. Margaret Sterner of Atalissa; twenty-six grandchildren and twenty great-grandchildren. Her husband and two daughters, Mrs. Hubert Beymer and Mrs. Forrest McQuillen preceded her in death. Funeral services were held at the home and at the Presbyterian church, with Rev. R.L. Blaisdell conducting the services, assisted by Rev. J.M. Newgard, pastor of the Grace Evangelical church. The pall-bearers, all nephews of the deceased, were: Lana Smith, Perry Smith, Donald Johnston, Clark Johnston, Gale Sterner and Dallas Sterner. Burial was in Oakdale cemetery. Your historian wanted to know the location of Oakdale cemetery and wrote to the editor of The Wilton Advocate. The following letter was received in reply:-- Dear Sir-: Your query regarding Oakdale cemetery received today. Oakdale cemetery is located just at the outskirts of the town of Wilton Junction. You seek information relative to the last resting place of "Grandma" Rush. This wonderful Christian lady was my next door neighbor for many years. My little children made her home their home almost as much as their very own. I have a little boy, now five years of age, who occasionally wonders when Grandma Rush is coming back. I was well acquainted with Frank Rush who passed away many years ago and know all of the Rush children, all girls. It here is any further information that I can furnish, I will be very pleased to do so. Respectfully, H.W. Thurston
THE KELLEY CLAN MAGAZINE
PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY: JAMES O. STEWART,
R.F.D.NO1, BOX 102, BROWNSVILLE,PA
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Number Twenty July 1, 1947. Free and worth it.
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In Memory of Emmor Hamilton Kelley BORN OCTOBER 20, 1881 --- DIED APRIL 24, 1944. In the spring of the year 1895 your historian went to visit the Heistersburg district school, about three miles from the Stewart homestead. He arrived at the school during the noon play period. Presently the bell rang and the boys and girls filed into the schoolhouse. While the rest were looking around and were listlessly fumbling in their desks for their books there was one boy who had promptly placed his opened book on his desk and was studing diligently. That boy was Emmor Kelley. By this time, dear reader, you are surmising the purport of this narative. You are reading a Horatio Algre story of a poor boy who achieved success. Emmor Hamilton Kelley was born in Heistersburg, a hamlet in Luzerne Township, Fayette Contry, Penna. It is doubtful if a district school with a few houses nearby could be called a town but nevertheless Heistersburg was a place of importance as it was the capital of Luzerne Township. It was at the schoolhouse that the school directors and other officials of the township held their meetings. Emmor was a son of Levi and Rhonda (Harn) Kelley. Levi Kelley was a son of Samuel Force Kelley and Ailse (sometimes calles Alice) Carter Kelley, Samuel Force Kelley was a son of our ancestor, William Kelley, Senior. Emmor was raised in an environment of diligence and honesty. By the road his father conducted a blacksmith shop. Mrs. Kelley was busy with her household and garden work while her sister, a widow by the name of Mrs. Mary Ann Ridge, wove bankets and rag carpets on a handloom in the sitting room. At the church picnics Mrs. Kelley always saw to it that Emmor was introduced to the preachers and other notables and thus the boy was early inpresseed with the idea that his place was among prominent people. In the shop he learned blacksmithing and experiented with tempering metal so that while still young he was a skilled metalist. At the age of sixteen he was apprenticed to John Herbertson's Sons (William H. and George S. Herbertson). From the start they recognizedthe young man's ability. This firm was the very best in which a beginner could serve an apprenticeship. John Herbertson, about the year 1836, had designed the first cast iron bridge erected in the United States. He also supervised the pattern making, the moulding and the erection of the bridge. This is the famous bridge over Dunlap creek at Brownsville. The Herbertsons also made many steamboat engines which were shipped to different states and to Mexico. Emmor was an apptentice with the Herbertsons fr about four years and then was a journeyman with them for three years. Next he went to the Mesta Machine Company and Homestead. Mr. James R. Herbertson (a son of George S. Herbertson) smilingly said to your historian: "When Emmor went to Mesta to get that position I went with him to recommend him but I did not get him the position. He got it himself because of his ability." On November 13, 1907 Emmor married Sarah Louise Porter, daughter of Nathaniel Ewing Porter and Adelaide (Gibbons) Porter. He was then working at Mesta. The young couple lived at Homestead for about a year. The mother of N.E. Porter was a sister of your historian's father so Emmor married into the Stewart clan (quite sensible of Emmor). Next Emmor worked at the Scottdale Foundry and Machine company for a year and four months. On April first of 1910 Emmor and George A. Stewart, Jr., started a partnership business on Water Street in Brownsville. This business continued until July of 1936. They still owned the property and rented it until August 1945 when it was sold to the Goulter Hardware Company. Emmor tended to the mechanical side of the business and George did the office work. At one time they had fourteen employees. About 1920 Kelley and Stewart patented and began the manufacture of autmotive repair equipment, which was sold in every country except Japan. Namely, Ford Engine Stands, Ford Quicl cting Lifts and Carriers, a Hydraulic Crane, and a Brake Tester for all makes of cars. Emmor invented a mounting for telescopes. Aided by Al Priselac (who made the lens) Emmor made a telescope for the Teacher's Training College at California, Penna. Emmor was the inventor of the Master Pendulum Clock by which one pendulum could run any number of clocks. Emmor was a school director in Brownsville for many years. It was largely through his efforts that the first athletic field was established on Water Street. He was a member of the Central PresbyterianChruch of BRownsville and a former member of the Rotary Club. He was a member of the Brownsville Lodge No. 60 Free and Accepted Masons, of the Royal Arch Chapter No. 164, of St. Omer's Commandery No. 7 Knights Templar of Brownsville, of the Uniontown Lodge of Perection, of Pittsburgh Consistory and Syria Temple A.A.O.N.M.S. He was a charter member of the Nemacolin Country Club. His hobby was amateur photography. Surviving are his wife; a daughter, Mary Stewart Kelley, at home, a teacher in the Brownsville schools; a son, Emmor H. Kelley, Jr., of Kent, Ohio; two grandchildren, children of Emmor H. Kelley, Jr., and Rose Elizabeth Foster Kelley; and a sister, Mrs. Mary E. Meyers of West Chester, Pa. A son, Charles Edward Kelley, born October 23, 1912, was instantly killed July 15, 1931 by being thrown from an automobile near Jefferson, Pa. Emmor and his son are buried in the Redstone Cemetery of Brownsville, Pa. We close with a statement made by George A. Stewart Jr.:--"There was no question about Emmor's honesty. In all our years together we never had a disagreement.
THE KELLEY CLAN MAGAZINE
PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY: JAMES O. STEWART,
R.F.D.NO1, BOX 102, BROWNSVILLE,PA
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Number Twenty One July 15, 1947. Free and worth it.
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The Reunions of 1942 and 1945 and 1946 One hundred twenty persons registered at the 1942 reunion which was held at the large old pavilion in Washington Park. Those who attended were the habitual ones so a list of names will not be given here. The reunion day was Mrs. George T. Kelley's birthday so we sang Many Birthdays to You. At the business meeting the clan gave twenty-five dollars to the historian to help him in his work of collecting history and publishing this magazine. It was decided to hold the reunion next year, war or no war. Bernice Briggs finished High School at the Trinity High School in 1942 with honors. A new clan member present was Guy Wayne Grimm, born September 24, 1941. He is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Grimm. Another new member present was Stephen Burdis Duane Kelley, born February third, 1942. He is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Donald Kelley. Correction:- In magazine seventeen in the list of those who attended the 1941 reunion the two names Charles Edward Kelley and Nellie Ellen Kelley should be Charles Edward Boggs and Nancy Ellen Boggs. Several families reported young men in the army. We hope to publish a magavine giving a list of our soldiers and sailors and marines so none of these names will be published at present. The following officers were elected for the following year:- President, George Gideon Kelley Vice President, Charles Freeman Kelley Secretary, Mary Stewart Kelley Treasurer, George T. Kelley Do you wonder what became of that twenty five dollars? In the late Autumn of 1942 I took a trip into West Virginia to hunt up history. I returned minus the twenty-five dollars. Shortly before the time for the 1943 reunion the historian and the local members of the clan discussed the advisability of holding the reunion. We decided it was best not to have it on account of the gasoline rationing. The historian sent postcard notice to all of the two hundred names on his mailing list. In 1944 we again decided not to have the reunion and the historian sent notices to that effect. In 1945 we had a hastily arranged reunion as we wanted James Cephas Kelley, who was not expected to be with us long, to enjoy another reunion with his beloved Kelley Clan. The reunion was held at the log cabin in Washington Park. One hundred twenty one members registered. The little boy on crutches was Duane Chadwick, age eleven. On July 27, 1945 he was working for a neighbor and got his leg fractured in a tractor and mowing machine. He was riding on the tractor. He was in the Greene County Memorial Hospital for six weeks. He is now at home and getting along well. The personalbe young chap in uniform was Don Meyers, age fifteen, of West Chester, Pa. He is a student at Carson Long Institute, a military school near Harrisburg. His mother is a sister of Emmor Kelley. Eva Kelley, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alvie Earl Kelley, recently married J. Robert Evans, an air cadet stationed at Amarillo, Texas. It was decided to hold the next reunion in Washington Park. The clan gave the historian twenty-five dollars. If such had not been done, you would not have this magazine now. A motion for the organization of the past presidents was made by James Edward Kelley. The motion was carried. We (your historian is one of them) are to be guarian angels, so to speak, sort of guiding the policies of the clan. A copy of the Washington Observer which I bought in Brownsville gave an account of the Peggy Lou Crile wedding. A notice of the wedding will appear in a coming magazine. The following officers were elected for the coming year:- President, Alvie Earl Kelley Vice President, Robert William Kelley Secretary, Mary Stewart Kelley Treasurer, George T. Kelley The 1946 reunion was held at the large old pavilion in Washington Park. One hundred twenty six attended. The youngest child presentwas Donald Lawrence Moninger, a month old the thirty-first of August. He is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Donald Moninger. The clan gave thirty dollars to the historian. Seven soldiers and four sailors were present. Mrs. Florence Kelley Kline came the farthest, 1530 miles, from Florida. She is a sister of William Lynn Kelley. The postcard announcements stated that a member of the International Brotherhood of Magicians would give a half-hour's magic show. The magician proved to be no other than the historian. The tricks were well enjoyed, especially by the youngsters. The following office were elected for the coming year:- President, Robert William Kelley Vice President, Kenneth Kelley Secretary, June Gregg (resigned) Treasurer, Mrs. Edith Kelley Craft.
THE KELLEY CLAN MAGAZINE
PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY: JAMES O. STEWART,
R.F.D.NO1, BOX 102, BROWNSVILLE,PA
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Number Twenty Two July 29, 1947. Free and worth it.
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Ulysses Grant Kelley Ulysses Grant Kelley, better known as Grant Kelley, of Dormont, died August 26, 1943. He was buried in the Mt. Lebanon Cemetery. He was a member of the Dormont Presbyterian Church. For forty years he was a member of Number 165 of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. He was born October 19, 1867 in Carmichaels, Pa., where his father, Freeman Kelley, was in partnership with James Clawson in carriage and wagon building and blacksmithing. Freeman left Carmichaels about 1873 and blacksmithing business there. About 1886 he left there and bought a farm near Khedive. Grant Kelley was the oldest of five children. One of these, Elizabeth Alice Kelley, died January 8, 1937. The others are James Edward Kelley of Steubenville, Ohio; Miss Ida Mae Kelley of Khedive; and Mrs. Olive Lucas of Uniontown. Grant went throught the district school at Ceylon and then attended the Greene Academy at Carmichaels for two terms. For two years he was with Isaac Dean, helping in the store and in building houses and barns. Then he went to Belle Vernon and worked as a carpenter tow years for Charles Corwin. Next he went to Pittsburgh. He worked at first for Smith and Lee, then was in business for himself as a contractr, and then as foreman for A.E. Gregg. Mr. Gregg had the contract for all interior woodwork of the new Roman Catholic cathedral in Pittsburgh. Grant worked as forman on the cathedral, on the woodwork. Next Grant came to Dormont and helped to build the first houses in Dormont, being foreman for J.A. Lashley for seven years. He worked in Chicago and in the Gary District and at the Great Lakes Naval Station, also for the government at Rock Island, Illinois, In 1919 he returned to Dormont, and was a carpenter and contractor there until his death. In 1892 he married Mary Lorena Neil of Belle Vernon. Grant and his wife had eight children, as follows: (1) Neil Freeman Kelley, born June 3, 1895 in Swissvale. He died July 31, 1900, is buried in Gibsonton Cemetery. (2) Mary Adele Kelley, a graduate of South High School, attended Success Business College in Chicago. She married Robert Slater Miller of Claysville. The have three children. (3) Theodore Grant Kelley, born Sept. 7, 1900 in Pittsburg, died of pneumonia in 1915, is buried in Mt. Lebanon Cemetery. (4) Edward Allen Kelley, born Sept. 20, 1902 in Pittsburg. He died July 22, 1922 at San Diego Harbor, Calif. He was a first class sailor and also was trained as a gunner on the flagship known as the Wickes. He was killed by a short circuit of electricity while in line of duty on shore. He is buried in the Mt. Lebanon Cemetery. (5) Elizabeth Ethel Kelley, born in Pittsburgh. She is a graduate of the South High School in Pittsburgh. She married Herbert R. Hillman, of North Side, a graduate of Carnegie Tech. (6) John Freeman Kelley, born January 11, 1908 in Pittsburgh. He is a graduate of the Dormont High School, class of 1925. He took a five year course in Architecture at Carnegie Tech, graduating in 1931. He married Christine Elizabeth Widaman, of Warsaw, Indiana. They have one girl. (7) Lois Esther Kelley, born in Dormont. She is a graduate of the Dormont High School. She married Roy Wagner Feldman. They have one son. (8) Dorothy Jean Kelley, born in Dormont. She is a graduate of Dormont High School, also of the Griffiths Beauty Culture School of Pittsburgh. She married Joel Swabb of Freedom. He is a teller in the First National Bank of Freedom. For information about Grant's ancestry and the death of his sister see magazine number two. Benjamin Adam Kelley In March 1941 your historian called at the home of Benjamin Adam Kelley in Fairchance. The aged man made the following statement:--"I was born November the 13, 1861 in Reedsville, West Virginia. I am a son of Joseph Kelley and Eliza Lewis Kelley, who were married young. Three of the children were born there, Adelia Kelley, Freeman Squire Kelley and myself. My mother died at about the age of forty-eight of fifty. My parents are buried at Gladesville, West Virginia. I went to a subscription school before the time of free schools. The teacher, Elgy Reppert, was severe. He whipped one boy until the blood came through his shirt and made it stiff when the blood dried. The pupils learned. He never gave a lick to me. I never got a whipping at school as I always tried to do what was right. In the short time that I went to free school, it was four months a year, I learned more that at the subscription school. The free school was the Brown School, a log cabin then. There was no Brown Chapel there then and churcl was held in the log school house. The teachers I went to there were John Lyons (or Lions), Mac Chipps, Mary Farrel and Mr. Cunningham. Lots of the pupils went until they were twenty-one and some after that by paying three cents per day. I started at about the age of seventeen and went for four years, had the four teachers. I went to Fairchance to stay in 1887. I fell in love with Arminta McCullough and married her. I met her in Fairchance. She was a daughter of John and Mary (Smith) McCullough. We were married November 17, 1887. We had twelve children." Mr. Kelley died in the Uniontown Hospital August 23, 1946. Interment was in Maple Grove Cemetery, Fairchance. See magazine number eleven for further information.
THE KELLEY CLAN MAGAZINE
PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY: JAMES O. STEWART,
R.F.D.NO1, BOX 102, BROWNSVILLE,PA
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Number Twenty Three July 12, 1948. Free and worth it.
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MY MOTHER'S BEDTIME STORIES Of a winter's night my mother and a little boy (who grew up to be your historian) would sit before the fire and watch the glowing embers form themselves into fantastic shaoes while she told bedtime stories of her girlhood days in the Bend of the River. Mother was born in the year 1839 so these narratives carry us back one hundred years to a generation forever gone. When mother was a little girl grandmother Kelley sent her to a neighbor's home on an errand. When she went into the kitchen she saw a table set with empty dishes. At the side of the kitchen was a large, open fireplace with a crane. A pot, suspended from the crane by a chain, was steaming over the fire on the hearth. Mother wondered how the woman could manage to procure for so many dishes when there was only one pot. After awhile the woman went to the table. She picked up a saucer with one hand and a big bowl with the other. Then she stepped to the pot. With the saucer as a ladle she ladled up a bowlful of soup. She placed the bowl of soup on the table, picked up a platter and returned to the pot. She fished in the pot with the saucer and produced a platter of meat. She placed the meat on the table, picked up a dish and went back to the pot. She scraped around in the pot with the saucer and brought up a dishful of dumplings. She set the dumplings on the table, picked up another dish and went back to the pot. She scraped in the pot with the saucer and brought up a dishful of boiled potatoes. She set the potatoes on the table, picked up another dish and went to the pot. She scraped in the pot and brought up a dishful of boiled cabbage.
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Grandmother Kelley spole Pennsylvania Dutch as well as English. She did not teach the Pennsylvania Dutch to her children and after her death they knew little about it. A girl came to the kitchen door and said she wanted to borrow the buegeleissen. The children did not know what a buegeleissen might be. One child brought the poker to the door and another brought the candelstick. The girl shook her head. They brought everything in the kitchen but the girl kept on shaking her head. Then they ransacked the house and brought every article they supposed a girl might want to borrow but the girl always shook her head. Suddenly mother had a brilliant idea. Perhaps a buegeleisen is a flatiron. She went to the kitchen cupboard and got the flatiron. The visitor took it and departed.
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A girl, who lived near-by, had her fortune told by an old gypsy woman. The gypsy told her that she would be walking along the road and she would meet a man carrying a horsebridle. He would be her future husband. A few days later the girl was walking along the road and she met a negro man carrying a horsebridle. She married him. Many years afterwards mother went to their home on an errand. When the woman came to the front door mother asked if they were well. The woman replied, "We are all well except my son, Sam. He is sick." Mother peeped in through the open door and saw a colored young man lying on a bed at the back of the room. Mother told me that he was as black as any Negro she ever saw and the woman was as white as any white person.
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A member of the Society of Friends sent his daughter to the Westtown School, a Quaker institution near Philadelphia. At the school she talked about how she walked on the piazza at home. That made the students think that her residence must be a grand mansion as it had a piazza. One of the young men decided to pay her a visit. He rode from Philadellphie to Brownsville on the stagecoach. Then he walked from Brownsville to the Rend on the River, a distance of more than ten miles. When he came to the top of the hill is sight of the place where she lived he saw that her residence was a little log house and that the piazza consisted of a few loose boards lying on the ground before the front door. He was so dusgusted that he went no farther. He turned right around and walked back to Brownsville and took the stagecoach to Philadelphia.
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An awfully proud woman lived in the Bend. She loaned a half cupful of coffee to another woman. When the borrower returned to repay the loan she brought a cupful of coffee. The proud woman threw the extra coffee into the fire and said, "I do not thank you for bringing back more than you borrowed."
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Another woman wore a great many rings on her fingers. These rings had diamonds and rubies on them and the woman liked to play the piano so she could show off her jewels. She went on a steamboat excursion. In the cabin she played on the piano to display her jewelry while the rest stood around and watched. It was a time of high water and the pilot was not able to steer the boat into the lock. The boat started to go over the day and stuck fast. The passengers were terrified as they thought the boat was going to upset and they would be drowned. The woman cried and screamed and wrung her hands. After awhile the captain and the pilot succeeded in getting the boat over the dam. When the passengers saw they were safe the woman seated hersef at the piano and began to play the piano.
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Mother had a cousin by the name of Sarah Ann Neel, who lived in Jefferson. Miss Neel was a graduate of Waynesburg College. A girl, whose home was in New York state, was a student at the college, Miss Neel asked her what she thought of Waynesburg College. The girl replied, "I think the students at Waynesburg College are the worst black-guards I ever sae." Miss Neel queried, "Why, what di they do that is blackguard?" The girl explained, "They are all the time going un huh, and huk uh." Miss Neel smiled and informed the girl that "un huh" means yes and "huk uh" means no. (To be continued)
THE KELLEY CLAN MAGAZINE
PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY: JAMES O. STEWART,
R.F.D.NO1, BOX 102, BROWNSVILLE,PA
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Number Twenty Four July 19, 1948. Free and worth it.
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BEDTIME STORIES (Concluded) At a revival service in the West Bend Methodist Church the minister gave the customary invitation for sinners to come to the mourners' bench. A man who had stolen a hog but had repented took hold of another man's hand and said, "Would you like to go to heaven?' The other man answered, "I don't want to be led to heaven by a hog thief."
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The corn crop failed one year. A woman came to the Kelley home to see if she could by some corn. The children told her they had none to spare. As the woman turned to go she said, "It is a strange thing but when we don't have any corn other people don't have any corn either."
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A man and his wife (her first name was Deborah) moved into the Bend from the South. One day the man stepped out into the yard, stretched his arm up toward the sky, felt the fog between his thumb and forefinger and said, "Too cold for Debby. Debby can't stay here." They moved away.
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A farmer whose first name was Joshua always went across the river to Millsboro when the weater was to rainy for farm work. The boys in the Bend made up a little poem about him, as follows:-- This er way And that er way And when it comes a rainy day Over to Millsboro, Joshua.
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When Squire Milliken the Crawford district school a new girl came to school. The squire asked her what her name was. The girl said, "Elizabeth." The squire continued, "What is your other name?" The girl answered "Liz." The squire insisted, "Yes, but what is your full name?" The girl said, "My name is Elizabeth Liz and nothing more." After that the squire always called her Elizabeth Liz and Nothing More."
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Here are two poems the children learned by heart:-- A Sabbath well spent Brings a week of content And health for the toils of the morrow; But a Sabbath profaned, Whatsoever may be gained, Is a sure forerunner of sorrow. Evening red and morning gray Will set the traveler on his way; But evening gray and morning red Will bring down rain upon his head.
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John Oliver Stewart (destined to be your historian's father) taught the Crawford district school in the year 1855. On the last day of school, as the boys and girls were preparing to go home, he stepped to a girl pupil by the name of Elizabeth Margaret Kelley (destined to be your historian's mother) and whispered into her ear, "I intend to come to see you sometime." She said, "All right." She told me she knew he meant that he was coming to court her. He did go to the Kelley home to court her and so (as fairy tales end) they were married and lived happily together forever after. In a beautiful ceremony at 12 o'clock noonm May 19, 1945, Miss Margaret Louise Crile (Better known to her friends as Peggy Lou (Crile) and Alvin Charles Newberry were united in marriage. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter M. Crile, 52 West Katherine Avenue, Washington, Pa. The groom is the son of Mrs. Ruth M. Guiver, Foxburg, Pa. The solemn vows were exchanged in the Trinity Epscopal Church of Washington, Pa. Rev. William D. McLean, Jr., pastor of St. Peter's Episcopal Church in Butler, officiated at the ceremony in the presence of the immediate families and close friends. The wedding music was played by Mrs. Jesse Doudna Phillips, church organist. The bride, who was given in marriage by her father, wore a white suit with navy accessories and carried a prayer book marked with a white orchid. The bride's sister, Mrs. Thelma Crile Reed, Baltimore, Md., was the matron-of-honor. She was attired in a pale pink suit. Her corsage was of blue flowers. The bride's mother wore a gold dress with purple accessories. Her corsage was of purple sweet peas. The bridegroom's mother was attired in gray. She wore a corsage of pink roses. Duncan McCoy of Foxburg served as best man for Mr. Newberry. Following the ceremony, a reception and luncheon were held at the Washington County Golf and Country Club. Out of town guests were from Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York City and Foxburg. Mr. Newberry was a student at Washington and Jefferson College, where he was majoring in Economisc. He had been honorably discharges from the United States Army. In February of 1948 he received his diploma from the college. Mr. and Mrs. Newberry are now living at their home in Akron, Ohio, where Mr. Newberry is connected with the Goodyear Rubber Company.
THE KELLEY CLAN MAGAZINE
PUBLISHED OCCASIONALLY BY: JAMES O. STEWART,
R.F.D.NO1, BOX 102, BROWNSVILLE,PA
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Number Twenty-Five @@@@@@@@@@@@@ SUMMER OF 1950
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THROUGH IRELAND In the summer of the year 1908 your historian spent three months in Ireland with his camera. He has a set of lantern slides which he made from his negatives. For a while he lectured at schools but the movies gradually crowded out still pictures so he retired from the lecture field. He believes that the youngsters of the clan would be interested in an old fashioned stereopticon lecture so the stereopticon and the pictures have been resurrected and the illustrated lecture will be given at the 1950 reunion. As the pictures are projected upon the screen by the stereopticon the historian will tell about Ireland's beautiful scenery, its castles and schools, its life in city and country, the games of the children, the wit and humor of the people. Not one sentence of this talk has been taken from books. In his own words the historian will tell what he saw. A feture of the lecture will be the showing of sevral Autochromes. In the year 1907 the Lumiere borthers in France invented the Autochrome process, the first commercially practical method of making natural color photographs. Your historian was one of the first to experiment with them. These Autochromes made in the invancy of color photography are very interesting. From the Brownsville Clipper-Monitor of December 4, 1908 we quote the following article written by editor Edwin P. Couse: "James O. Stewart, son of John O. Stewart, of Luzerne township, is home from a trip abroad during which he spent about four months in Ireland and saw that part of Great Britain thoroughly. "Mr. Stewart is an enthusiastic anateur photographer and brought home some fine color plates in which the object appear in their own colors. He has interior and outdoor views of this character which are very attractive. He was permitted to get some good views of this character which are very attractive. He was permitted to get some good views at the Earl of Dunraven's place and the Duke of Abercorn's estate. Other pictures show the Blarney Stone, Giant's Causeway and a street in a village deserted by emigration. "Mr. Stewert, who is a graduate of W. & J., also had a course in textiles at the Philadelphia Commercial Museum and as designer for an Alabama cotton mill for some time. In his trip abroad this time he followed a definite plan of not undertaking too much but of seeing thoroughly what he mapped out. In this way he got acquainted with rural and urban Ireland as few tourists do. "One photograph of boys in Limerick is particularly interesting. In Ireland a favorite diversion of boys is walking on the hands and all try to excel in this sport. Mr. Stewart got a number of lads lined up and in a series of three pictures he shows the preparation, spring and actual feat of walking on hands. He is a capable and observing young man and all of his acquaintances are glad to hear of his success." You will never be sorry if you bring the children to the 1950 reunion to see these pictures. This reunion will be held in the Washington (Pa.) park on the Sunday before Labor Day in the large old pavilion, the first one as you enter the park. The dinner will be the usual clan dinner. Bring your share and bring a little extra for the historian and his assistant who operates the stereopticon. Also bring your own cups and silverware and coffee pot. Coffee will be made for all by the committee. Table cloths, napkins, plates, ice cream and coffee will be furnished.
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THE REUNIONS The 1947 reunion was held in the log cabin in Washington park. Seventy-eight were present. Each person who registered was given a large envelope containing magazined No. 20, No. 21 and No. 22. The Thomas family of Baltimore came the farthest. The clan presented $15.93 to the historian to help him in publishing the magazine. Thank you so much but that amount does not go far now. It was decided to hold the 1948 reunion at Conneaut. The following officers were elected for the coming year:- President, Walter Kelley Vice Presi. Wynn Kelley Secretary, Mary Crane Treasurer, W.W. Kelley The 1948 reunion was held at Conneaut, Ohio. On account of the recent death of the wife of the historian's brother the historian could not be present. This is the only reunion he has missed since he began to attend them. Thirty-seven persons registered. The secretary, Mrs. Raymond Crane, sent $10.81 to the historian. The following officers were elected for the coming year:- President, Don Kelley Vice Presi. Steve Fisher Secretary, Mrs. Don Kelley Treasurer, Charles Kelley The 1949 reunion was held in Washington park at the new pavilion at the left of the park entrance. Sixty-eight persons registered. The historian announced that he is planning to issue a series of magazines (beginning with No. 26) which wll give the war records of the Kelleys. Several subscribed at a dollar each. One person subscribed for five. Let the historian-editor hasten to add that the dollar pays only for the Civil War records. When we get around to the World Wars the editor will be shreking for another dollar. The following officers were elected for the coming year:- President, Lloyd M. Kelley Vice Presi., John Kelley Secretary, Phyllis Fisher Treasurer, Steve Fisher
OUR KELLEYS IN THE CIVIL WAR
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NUMBER ONE Edited by James O. Stewart, A.M. August 16, 1959
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ABBREVIATIONS USED IN THESE MAGAZINES
b....Born m....married d....died s....son(s) g....girl(s)(?).....illegible A town is in Pennsylvania if no state is named.
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Please accept this magazine, and keep it, as a special of the magazines to be issued in a set called OUR KELLEYS IN CIVIL WAR. I am not taking subscriptions at present but when the set is completed the sale will begin. I frefer not to sell individual magazines. This set of magazines is a must. In December of 1950 I mailed almost 200 questionnaires. The replies indicated that more than 175 families could not name one Kelley who was in the Civil War. Only one person, James Edward Kelley, could name as many as four. As a metter of fact, moren than a dozen of our young men were soldiers in the Civil War. Twenty-nine years ago I received the follwoing post-card: Conneaut, Ohio August 18, 1930 Dear Friend, The Kelley Reunion was organzed Sept. 1, 1929 at J.Y. Kelley's of Monroe Center at Conneaut, Ohio. The officers are President - Seth Kelley Secretary - Ruth Kelley Treasurer - J.Y. Kelley At this meeting various plans were made for the next reunion. This is to be held the Sunday before Labor Day, August 31, 1930 at the Washington Park at Washington, Pa. We hope to be there. Don't disappoint us! We want you to have a talk and are counting on you. We would apreciate it very much. Respectfully yours, Ruth Kelley, Secretary. I went to the reunion. At the business session they decided that the clan needed historian. Emmor Kelley recommended me and I was elected. I have served in that office ever since. I soon learned I was facing difficulties. All of the family and all but one of the granchildren of William Kelley, Senior, were dead. Family Bibles and other records were scattered in all directions. Later on most of the Civil War records and the records of my branch were destroyed. All but two have been traced down. According to tradition, five Kelley brothers, Scotch and Protestants, came from Ireland. Two of them went west and we do not know what became of them. They are known as the lost Kelleys. So much for tradition. Our Kelleys came from New Jersey to this vicinity before or during the Revolutionary War. In the cemetery for the Hewitt Presbyterian (originally Cumberland Presbyterian) Church of Rices Landing, is a large tombstone with this discription: In memory of William Kelley, Sr. who departed this life July 14, 1841 in the 82nd year of his age. He lived in credit and died lamented by all who know him. He wa a believer in the divinity of Jesus Christ and an honest man and this stone is erected to his memory by John Walters. By this tombstone is another which reads as follows: Elisabeth, Wife of William Kelley Died Oct. 15, 1856, aged 79 years, 6m., 21 days.
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For further information about Father William you might read, or re-read, Kelley Clan Magazine No. 4 William and Elisabeth lived on a farm at the edge of Rices Landing. Mrs. Belle Christopher of Rices Landing had the old Kelley record. A similar record (probably a copy) was at the home of Emma Kelley at Halleck, West Va. The first entry in this record is: Sarah Freeman was born April the fifth day, 1731. In the Archives of New Jersey is the following marriage record, Samuel Force (Woodbridge) married Sarah Freeman (Woodbridge) July 4, 1754. They could have had a daughter Elisabeth, who could have been the Elisabeth, who married William Kelley, Sr. and have a son Samuel Force Kelley. This is almost certainly the case for I have learned that the maiden name of Samuel Force Kelley's mother was Force. She was a member of a rich family in New Brunswickm N.J. (close to Woodbridge, M.J.) A plausible summary of this is that Sarah Freeman married Samuel Force. Their daughter Elisabeth Force married William Kelley, Sr. One of the ten children was named Samuel Force Kelley. Now we come to the record of the ten children of William and Elisabeth. Most of the birthdates are copied from the old Kelley record. Other information is from family Bibles, tombstones, etc. (1) Sarah Kelley, b. July 14, 1800 on Monday, d. Oct. 21, 1840, m. Charles Crago 3 s. 4g. (2) Eliza b. Wednesday at 8 o'clock in the morning, May 19th, 1802. d. Feb. 4, 1834. m. James Neel 3 s. 3 g. (3) William Kelley, Jr. b. Jan. 13, 1804, Tuesday. Married Elizabeth Ewart. 4 s. 4 g. (According to the 200 year calendar Jan. 13 was on Friday. (4) James Kelley b. Friday at twelve o'clock December 18, 1805. d. April 6, 1896. m. Elizabeth Hewitt b. March 14, 1807. d. April 14, 1861. 3 s 5 g. (According to the 200 year calendar Dec. 18 was Wed.) (5) Samuel Force Kelley was born on the Sabbeth at the rising of the sun April 10th in the year of Our Lord One thousand eight hundred and eight. d. Dec. 12, 1880. m. Ailse (later called Alice) Carter of Millsboro b. Aug. 14, 1817 d. March 3, 1893. 8 s. 3 g. The birthdate of 1810 on Samuel's tombstone must be wrong. (6) Freeman Kelley b. in 1810. One record says April 12, and another record says April 21. m. Mary Ailes b. May 8, 1809. 7 s. 5 g. (7) Harriet Kelley b. Oct. 19, 1812. (One record says 1813) m. John Walters. Several children. (8) Charlotte Kelley b. 1814. No further information. (9) Rachel Kelley b. 1818 d. April 7, 1891, aged 73 year. m. Daniel McCullough b. 1815 d. Feb. 14, 1891 aged 76 years? 5 s. 5 g. (10) Morris Kelley, mentioned in the will of William Kelley, Sr. Evidently he died before his father for the will says that his son Morris's children are to draw his share. No more information about Morris.
THE KELLEY CLAN MAGAZINE
SEPTEMBER 1, 1968
Historian-- Lloyd M. Kelley
Washington Park R.D.6, Box III, Washintgon, Pa. 15301
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Kenneth C. Kelley Kenneth Charles Kelley, 55, of Nineveh, died at 11:00 p.m., Saturday, February 23, 1967, in the Washington Hospital. His death was unexpected in that it had been thought he was recovering satisfactorily, after suffering a heart attack, Tuesday. Mr. Kelley, a son of the late Charles Freeman Kelley and Nellie Tharp Kelley, was born January 18, 1912, in Illinois, where he spent his early life. He had resided for a number of years at Nineveh, where he was active in community affairs, and in the Nineveh Methodist Church, having served as Sunday School Superintendent, of the board of trustees, and as a member of the Lay Council. He was also an active member of the Nineveh Volunteer Fire Company and, prior to formation of the West Green School District, had served as a school director in Morris Township. During World War II he served with the Navy in both the European and Pacific theaters, and he was a member of James Farrell Post No. 330, American Legion, Waynesburg. He was an ardent craftsman and was known throughout the area for his accurate replicas of buildings, bridges and other landmarks. His model of the Nineveh Methodist Church has been displayed at a number of places. Surviving are his wife, Dorotha Holberty Kelley, whom he married October 23, 1937. Two daughter, Patty Sue and Dorotha Jean, both at home; three sisters, Phylis, wife of Steve Fisher, of Greensboro, Bernadine, wife of William Torrey, of New York, and Violet, wife of Matthew Boggs of Morgantown, W.Va.; and two brothers, Robert, of Riversville, W.Va.; and Don, of Greensboro. A son, Kenneth C. Kelley, Jr., died in 1950. A brother Burdis, is also deceased.
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Mary S. Kelley Mary S. Kelley, 76, of Washington R.D. 6, died Tuesday, February 28, 1967, at 5:55 p.m. in the Washington Hospital. She was born January 10, 1891, at Gretna, a daughter of George and Mary Ellen (Black) Munce. She was married November,11, 1912, to Winnett Hughes Kelley, son of James Cephas and Mary Ann (Roach) Kelley, who survives. She was a member of the First Presbyterian Church in Canonsburg for many years. After moving to Washington, she became a member of the Liberty Methodist Church f which she was a member of her death. Mary S. Kelley leaves, one son, Lloyd M. Kelley, and one daughter, Martha Ellen, wife of Albert Fullick, both of Washington, R.D.6l one borther, Carl Ross Munce, of West Finley; six grandchildren and seven great grandchildren.
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JOSEPH E. KELLEY Joseph E. Kelley, 54, of Houston, died suddenly of a heart attack in Canonsburg General Hospital at 12:30 a.m. Tuesday, March 14, 1967. He was born March 8, 1913, in Washington, a son of the late Elizabeth Hampsey Kelley and Alvie Earl Kelley of Eighty Four, who survives. Mr. Kelley had been a resident of Houston the last 20 years and was the owner of the Acme Machine Company of Houston. Surviving in addition to his father are his wife, Edna Barnes Kelley; his step-mother, Mrs. A.E. Kelley of Eighty Four; three daughters, Mrs. Margaret Merante and Mrs. Lee Gregory, both of Houston, and Mrs. Sharon Labozzo, Canonsburg; six sisters: Mrs. Margie Smith, Washington, Mrs. Rea Hartley, Murrysville, Mrs. Eva Evans, MIllsvale, Mrs. Marian Partezanna, Cleveland, Ohio, Mrs. Patty Mellars, Washington, D.C., and Mrs. Sarah Ames, Eighty Four; three brothers, Paul Kelley, McMurray, Ray Kelley, Scenery Hill, and Thomas Kelley, Eighty Fourl also two grandchildren.
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MARIE ALENE THOMAS Our precious little grand daughter passed away June 28, 1967. Marie Alene was the daughter of our older son, Stephen and his wife Anne. She was nineteen months old. Part of a letter received from Thelma Thomas, Anchorage, (dated, August 14, 1967.)
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ALVIE EARL KELLEY Alvie Earl Kelley, 77, founder and former president of Kelley Industries, died Wednesday, March 29, 1967, at 8:15 p.m. in Washington Hospital. Mr. Kelley, who lived at Eighty Four, was president of the firm from 1946 to 1965 when he sold the business to retire. He was also one of the founders of Washington Mould, Machine and Foundry, where he was employed 30 years before forming Kelley Industries. Prior to that he worked for the Hazel Atlas Glass Co., Contiental Can Co., Westing-house Electric Corp and American Brakeshoe. Co. Mr. Kelley had several patents, the best known on a shape lathe and a thread milling machine. He was well known throughout the tri-state area for moulds and the ability toi machine different shapes. He was born April 14, 1889, near Amity, a son of James and Martha Ann (Roach) Kelley. His father was father was a country blacksmith. A graduate of Washington Business College, he was a member of the Junior Order, American Mechanics, Mispah Council No.361. As a young man, he won several boxing tournaments and competed in a number of track meets. He was first mrried to Elizabeth Hampsey. From this union two daughters survive, Margaret, wife of Harold W. Smith, of Washington, and Grace, wife of Rea L. Hartley, of Murraysville. A son, Joseph E. Kelley, died March 13, 1967. After the death of his first wife, he was married to Marian Martin, who survives with the following children: Eva, wife of Robert Evans, of Millvale, N.J.; Patricia, wife of James Mellars, of Fairfax, Va.; Marian, wife of Alex Partezana, of Cleveland, Ohio; Paul E., of McMurray; Raymond A., of Scenery Hill; Sarah, wife of Lloyd Ames, of Eighty Four R.D.2, and Thomas F. at home. Also surviving are two brothers, James of Washington R.D.3, and Winnett Kelley, of Lagonda; one sister, Mary, wife of Jack Lehner, of Wolfdale; 29 grand children and nine great grand children. Two brothers, Raymond and John, and two sisters, Elsie Noover and Emma Crile, are deceased.
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BRADLEY KELLEY Bradley Scott Kelley, 5, of London, Ohio, was killed instantly when he was struck by a truck Wednesday, Jaune 28, 1967, in Bath, N.Y. He was born Feb. 20, 1962, in Columbus, Ohio, a son of John B. Kelley, Jr., and Sandra Moon Kelley. Surviving are his parents; one sister, Laura Lou, at home; his maternal grandparetns, Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Moon, New Castle, formerly of Washington, and paternal grandmother, Mrs. John B. Kelley, Washington. The 37th Kelley Reunion met on August 20th 1967, at the Log Cabin in Washington, Pa. with the largest turnout (83) attending since 1958. Eddie Kelley was Presdient for this year, but due to his move to Los Almos, New Mexico, Neal Kelley, V. Pres. conducted the meeting. We had no idea that Eddie and his family were in town on vacation, but we were pleasantly surprised when they showed up just before meeting time. Mr. and Mrs. Roy Bolton from Ft. Lauderdale, Florida attended tis year and Mrs. Bolton spoke to those present. He stressed how important it is to be with your relatiives at these annual reunions and also he reminised about some of our first Kelley reunions. By the way Roy Bolton was the oldest person this year at 80 years young, with Tom Chadwick running a close second at 79 years young. The youngest child was George Alan Kelley 2, son of Mr. and Mrs. Neal Kelley. It's a sad time when we have memorials to those who passed away during the years, but we have their memory in our hearts and we can't forget those who were so faithful to the Clan. It's always a pleasure to receive notes and letters form the ones who can't be with us at this time, and we do appreciate hearing about their familys and etc. It is important that information pertaining to the Kelley History, and I would appreciate it if you known of any of the Kelley History, and I would appreciate if if you know of any of the above changes please write or call. Sylvia R. Hathaway Sylvia Romaine Gilmore Hathaway, 82, of Grant Street, Washington, died at 8:32 a.m., Friday, February 23, 1990, in Washingto Hospital, after a long illness. She was born March 22, 1907, in Greene County, a daughter of George and Dicie Roach Kelley. Mrs. Hathaway was a member of First Christian Church. She was married twice. On September 11, 1928, she married George Edward Gilmore, who died in March 1937. On April 28, 1948 she married Albert F. Hathaway, sho survives. Also surviving are two sons, Reed Gilmore and George E. Gilmore, both of Washington; a daughter, Mrs. Robert (Delores) Durbin of Washington; a brother, Clyde Jim Kelley of Washington; two sisters, Opal Briggs of Washington and Wahneitia Moninger of Lone Pine; seven grand-children; and three great grandchildren. Deceased are a daughter, Dorothy Florence Gilmore; two sisters, Gladys Martin and Lela Sanders; and three brothers, Alfred Kelley and twin brothers, Floyd and Lloyd Kelley, who died in infancy. HATHAWAY--Friends of Sylvia Romaine Gilmore Hathaway of Grant Street, Washington, who died Friday, February 23, 1990,will be received from 7 to 9 p.m. Saturday and from noon to 3 and 7 yo 9 p.m. Sunday at William G. Neal Funeral Homes Ltd., 925 Allison Avenue, Washington, where services will be held at 1 p.m. Monday, February 26, with Dr. John B. Ledford officiating. Interment in Lone Pine Cemetery.


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