Our Family Histories
Entry for July 30, 2006

Welcome to Our Family Histories by Susi C. Pentico and Helen S. Durbin.



Hello, this is the first post to our blog. Here you can ask questions and hopefully we will have answers for you.


Good Hunting!

2006-07-30 14:35:23 GMT
Comments (95 total)
Author:Anonymous
HI Everyone
Please take advantage of this site. May we all find more cousins
and more friends. Susi
--Susi
<mailto:SusiCP@aol.com>
2006-07-30 19:08:31 GMT
Author:lorieis1
hey its me i need the website addy so i can check out the website.
2006-08-18 14:37:57 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Hi Lorie, Thanks for stopping by. The website url is http://www.ourfamilyhistories.com. Love you neicie!
--Helen
<mailto:webmaster@ourfamilyhistories.com>
2006-08-22 12:01:06 GMT
Author:Anonymous
HI everyone, Helen this is super idea. I have been very busy
working on setting up the agenda for speakers at the
genealogyforum.org web site that the old Golden Gate Forum moved to.
Weather is good here. Trust it's good for all.
The entire month of October we will be having guest speakers,
quizzes and chats please check it out in a few days schedules will be
and running. Blessings Susi
2006-08-28 16:23:45 GMT
Author:Anonymous
HI, I think I will turn this into a tips and hints site also.
Since I teach weekly, I can share some of my thoughts with those who
come here and help them with genealogy.
First tip is Pennsylvania/MidAtlantic area has a chat
on Friday nights on AOL at the RootCellar at 10 eastern.
Second is I do Mid Atlantic chat on Tues nights at genealogyforum.org
in the chat room same time 10 eastern. Susi
2006-08-28 16:35:55 GMT
Author:Anonymous
I am trying to find Cindy Durbin, who was a descendent of Lawrence Crow of Washington County PA through her Chalfant lines. I was in touch with her 10 years ago and cannot find her. She also made paperdolls. I would like to reach her about genealogy. Coleen handlon-Shaull
--Coleen
<mailto:coleen1951@yahoo.com>
2006-08-29 12:26:49 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Hi Coleen, I chcecked into your question and found Cindy Durbin with a new website. Here it is: http://www.paperdolls.org/. Hope this helps you. Sincerely, Helen
--Helen
<mailto:webmaster@ourfamilyhistories.com>
2006-09-05 12:38:05 GMT
Author:Anonymous
HI Everyone, Are you checking out the Conference we have on
genealogyforum.org? Every evening we have guest speakers and lots
of fun. SusiCP ie GFS Susi
--Susi Pentico
2006-10-08 22:40:44 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Well obviously few take this spot serious but we have had an awesome
conference at www.genealogyforum.org

WE have four days left. Tonite through Halloween which is the WITCH Hunt event.
--SusiCP@aol.com
2006-10-28 16:11:58 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Helen your being hunted for Durbin data and more Durbin data,
I hope to see you on or get call from you soon.
Clarkcamp5@aol.com is one..
ctsmithson@peoplepc.com gave you data years ago and wants to talk more

Chris Smithson. sent me 21 Nov please contact asap.. HUGS
--Susi
<mailto:SusiCP@aol.com>
2006-12-02 21:32:23 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Hi Susi, I am here at school. I will have to email Chris later. Hope this finds you well.
Helen
2006-12-13 14:32:27 GMT
Author:Anonymous
January has come and gone. Has everyone kept up with the
many new web pages for search and have you tried rootswebs
archived search engine. It's awesome. Susi
--Susi
<mailto:SusiCP@aol.com>
2007-01-30 20:34:56 GMT
Author:Anonymous
IS everyone aware that NARA is going to raise rates. I do not object but
think the pricing should be more equatable. I think $50 for a packet and so
many cents a page beyond that would be more fair. I wish everyone
would support a similiar idea so they could grasp the idea.

--Susi
<mailto:SusiCP@aol.com>
2007-03-18 22:49:41 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Ancestry.com is going to stop servicing the LDS sites
for use starting April 1, 2007. Check your local libraries
to see if they are offering these services. IN the San Diego region
the Chula Vista Library has Ancestry. The San Diego County Library has Ancestry
and the San Diego City Library has Ancestry. Carlsbad has Heritage Quest.
It may also have Ancestry.
--Susi
<mailto:SusiCP@aol.com>
2007-03-18 22:52:59 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Anyone find a Will for DuVall in Fayette, Washington, or Greene Co PA?
Also looking for Will for oldest son JOhn DUVall whom lived
in OHIO. Trying to find all of Alexander11 siblings. Susi
2007-03-18 22:55:24 GMT
Author:ohladyluk
Helen I found Daniel's parents and Edgar's descendents. left a message for you. long wait but well worth it. Thx-u for all your help seeking this family out. Don't stay a stranger
2007-05-10 01:28:40 GMT
Author:Anonymous
I went to your blob and checked it out. Great! For my records, who were Daniels parents? Would love to see you again sometime. I now live in Mather.
--Helen
<mailto:hsdurbin@hotmail.com>
2007-06-11 14:48:39 GMT
Author:Anonymous
HI all, Michigan was great. NOW back to Genealogy, Found some new things on DUVALL and on HUFFMAN. We are all hoping Helen recovers from her surgery with less complications than she so far has had.
Hope to fix site up and replace dead leads soon. Susi
--SusiCP
<mailto:SusiCP@aol.com>
2007-07-21 03:51:35 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Regarding queries:

1.   For place of birth try 1870 census with that name for where (State) born
  doesn't not mean right but clue at least.
2.   Check previous and later census for same data.(compare)
3.   Watch for same surnames as yours or other family surnames on those pages
retain the page not just that one item if others mentioned.
4.   Earlier census will list where person born but not parents.
5.   Read about region and if boundaries moved (when didn't they :>} )
6.   Use rootsweb.com to check regions and or surnames
7.   Post to surname or region groups ( I recently learned that some
religions have groups (lists) to join
8.   If feasible join a society near you. Fees are generally small and the
assets are enormous.
     I belong to several, each offering different types of help due to type of
society.
     Brick Wall Assistance, personal mentor, monthly speaker, newsletters,
computer assistance
9.   Queries should have: Name, place/es, time, sometimes pertinent to add
related names to clarify person.
     Thomas SCOTT, Pittsylvania Co. VA, lived here born around 1730 Orange Co.,VA
     son John born 1761(?), m 1782 a   Sophia MURRAY/MURRY Pittsylvania Co. VA    
     Looking for information on Thomas where born, kin, and Sophia parents.

10.   When posting to region list you can change it abit to read like this
      SCOTT, MURRY/MURRAY, LEWIS   from 1730 's ? to current.
     Some in this family migrated to today's Cumberland Co. KY. (old Green
Co., KY)
    

       Cheers and Blessings, Susi Pentico

--Susi
<mailto:SusiCP@aol.com>
2007-07-28 16:08:43 GMT
Author:Anonymous


Anyone that is family that lives in Prince George Maryland area?
Need assistance there. WE may have found Alexander 1 and other siblings of Alexander 11.

--SusiCP
<mailto:SusiCP@aol.com>
2007-07-28 16:16:33 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Today I learned about the term LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION, it was very informative and I had recently found that concept worked many times when unsure what step is next. In helping a friend without census names I went to the location of birth and posted last name. Came up with 6 immediate possibles. I did the same for the next year back and got the same results with name showing family was looking for. So remember if you have nothing but location put it in and then
search for the surname or the birthdate or the person. :>)
--SusiCP
<mailto:SusiCP@aol.com>
2007-07-31 01:57:58 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Today I learned about the term LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION, it was very informative and I had recently found that concept worked many times when unsure what step is next. In helping a friend without census names I went to the location of birth and posted last name. Came up with 6 immediate possibles. I did the same for the next year back and got the same results with name showing family was looking for. So remember if you have nothing but location put it in and then
search for the surname or the birthdate or the person. :>)
--SusiCP
<mailto:SusiCP@aol.com>
2007-07-31 01:57:59 GMT
Author:Anonymous
A reminder for you all is review your old paperwork/files and you may find data you have forgotten you had or did not fit in the past. I like to do mine the first of every year as I clear out things I do not feel I can any longer utilize.
--SusiCP
<mailto:SusiCP@aol.com>
2007-08-09 02:23:56 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Message: 2
Posted with David's permission in my files. SusiCP

Date: Wed, 08 Aug 2007 12:28:16 -0500
From: David Scott <ListAdmin@ClanScottSociety.org>
Subject: [SCOTT] Make your subject lines meaningful
To: scott@rootsweb.com
Message-ID: <200708081754.l78HsN15001669@mail.rootsweb.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed

Are you familiar with the expression that you can't judge a book by
its cover? That may be true, but many RootsWeb mailing list users do
just that on a daily basis when they check their surname mailing list email.

While it might be a stretch to compare a query posted to a RootsWeb
mailing list to a book on a shelf, it does have some merit. The title
of a book is like the subject of a mailing list message. If you are
not attracted by the subject, you probably won't bother reading any further.

In our busy lives we are often forced to make quick judgments as to
what we are going to read and what we are going to discard,
especially when scanning through email from our mailing lists. In
many cases, you have a just split second to draw the reader to your
message before he clicks delete and moves on to the next email message.

A quick check of actual subject lines in the RootsWeb list archives
produces subjects such as: Family?, Census Records, Obituary,
Marriage Notice, Smith Family and the ever-popular Digest Vol. 2, No. 6.

When you post a query on a mailing list, do you carefully consider
what information to include in the subject? Is it as unoriginal and
uninformative as those in the paragraph above? This might be why you
have not had any responses.

Put yourself in the place of the person viewing the email subject
lines in their in-box or scanning a RootsWeb surname list digest
index. Consider how likely you would be to click to view the actual
message. How much more likely would the reader might be to take time
to read a message with the more informative subject "John SMITH, born
1799, New Haven, Connecticut" or "Looking for census records for
Martin JONES, New Castle County, Delaware, about 1910" or "Need
marriage record for Morris LEVIN and Pearl JACOBS, New York City, 1930."

The more complete and uniquely meaningful clues you can put in the
subject line, the more likely someone with a similar interest will
read your email. If they read your message, it may increase your
chances of making a connection with someone with some missing pieces
to your genealogy puzzle. It is as simple as that.

Each message subject line should include (if known and appropriate):
names, dates, places, and perhaps the type of information you wish to learn.

Or you can use a standard shorthand used by skilled researchers on
this list since it began. The subject line should have (if known and
appropriate) a full name, locale abbreviation, a direction of
migration, another locale abbreviation, and the approximate dates.
This method puts as much information as possible in the shortest
space. Some email software won't show a long subject line.

For instance, George Scott moving from Scotland to New Brunswick,
Canada, to Kentucky around 1820 to 1840 would look like:

SCOTT, George SCT>NB CAN>KY abt. 1820-1840

If you don't know the complete name, migration route, or dates, it is
permissible to leave them out of the subject line and put an
explanation in the message body. This list, like many others at
RootsWeb, automatically adds a subject line prefix with the surname
[SCOTT], so you can even leave out Scott in George's name in the
example above.

If you subscribe to this list in Digest mode, this is very
important: When replying to a digest message, quote only the
specific message to which you are replying, removing the rest of the
digest from your reply. Also, remember to change the subject of your
reply so that it coincides with the message subject to which you are
replying.

Subject lines like Digest Vol. 2, No. 6 are meaningless. Scrolling
through screens full of irrelevant messages included i
--David Scott
<mailto:ListAdmin@ClanScottSociety.org>
2007-08-13 01:58:20 GMT
Author:Anonymous
David Scott also shared the above site for abbreviations to be used when writing to rootsweb lists. I did not know if this data either . Susi
--David Scott
<mailto:SusiCP@aol.com>
2007-08-13 02:00:42 GMT
Author:Anonymous
http://helpdesk.rootsweb.com/codes/index.html

Here is the url
--SusiCP
2007-08-13 02:02:32 GMT
Author:Anonymous
BE Aware that NY is at it again. I plan to post the message here within a few hours. It seems they want to curtail research more than ever before, what is wrong with NY people in government I keep trying to understand them since I am an ancestor of them.
--SusiCP
2007-08-13 02:17:10 GMT
Author:Anonymous
The GenealogyForum.org has started a new blog that will be giving data and sharing information with genealogists to help them with their research. If you post here we can give you the url to read it, since I have yet to figure out the url situation. I will have by time you contact me.
--SusiCP@aol.com
2007-08-13 19:13:57 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Dear GenCircles User,

We have a very exciting announcement to share with you! Pearl Street Software, maker of GenCircles and Family Tree Legends, has merged with MyHeritage.com. In the first of many positive developments that will come from this merger, Family Tree Legends and GenCircles are now 100% free!

Why did you merge with MyHeritage.com?
So we can grow! The development team from Pearl Street Software has joined the much larger MyHeritage team so we can bring you amazing new tools to aid your search. MyHeritage brings vast resources that will enable technologies like Smart Matching to greatly improve, to the benefit of everyone!

What will happen to GenCircles and Family Tree Legends?
GenCircles, the Family Tree Legends software program, and the Family Tree Legends Records Collection are now free. That's right - in one announcement, we have made the highest-rated genealogy software program, the massively popular GenCircles site, and over 400 million records in the Family Tree Legends Records Collection completely free! This is a significant day for genealogists everywhere!

What about support?
With the backing of MyHeritage, we can now offer much improved support. For email support on our various services, please email ftl@myheritage.com <mailto:ftl@myheritage.com> for FTL or gencircles@myheritage.com <mailto:gencircles@myheritage.com> for GenCircles.

What else can we look forward to?
- MyHeritage has made significant improvements to our Smart Matching
technology in the past 6 months and these improvements are being released now for the first time.
- MyHeritage's Family Tree Builder 2.0 has just been released and
contains many of the technologies found in Family Tree Legends. Family Tree Builder has support for real-time Smart Matching and is available in 17 languages. You can automatically import your FTL file into Family Tree Builder if you choose to. You can use both programs completely for free - we urge you to see which one is right for you!
- MyHeritage has launched an initiative to map and connect all of the world's family trees using Smart Matching technology, and is well on their way with more than 100,000 trees!

Can we trust MyHeritage as a good steward for our data?
One of the reasons we chose to merge with MyHeritage.com was their absolute respect for users' data. GenCircles built its reputation on respecting its users and their data - we are proud to say that MyHeritage.com shares this respect with us!

This is an exciting day in our company's history and we couldn't have done it without the help of our amazing users! The joined teams of MyHeritage and Pearl Street Software are committed more than ever to providing the best genealogy products and services, and keeping them free!

Best Regards,
Cliff Shaw
President & CEO
Pearl Street Software

To no longer receive any emails from GenCircles, change your email preferences in My GenCircles at <http://my.gencircles.com/>
--community@gencircles.com
<mailto:SusiCP@aol.com>
2007-08-23 23:15:18 GMT
Author:Anonymous
It looks like more mergers and more news for genealogists.

SusiCP
2007-08-23 23:16:44 GMT
Author:Anonymous
North America Local and County Histories to Go Online

from FamilySearch.org (August 15, 2007):

Three genealogical libraries pool their
collections in massive digitization effort

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH­Thousands of published
family histories, city and county histories,
historic city directories, and related records
are coming to the Internet. The Allen County
Public Library (ACPL) in Fort Wayne, Indiana,
Brigham Young University Harold B. Lee Library,
and FamilySearch's Family History Library in Salt
Lake City announced the joint project today. When
complete, it will be the most comprehensive
collection of city and county histories on the
Web­and access will be free at
<http://www.familyhistoryarchive.byu.edu>www.familyhistoryarchive.byu.edu.

The digital history project will target over
100,000 published family histories and thousands
of local histories that are rich in names as well
as biographical and genealogical data associated
with those names. "Publishing those collections
from the three libraries involved will make a
significant and attractive family history digital
library online for genealogists and historians,"
said David Rencher, director of Records and Information for FamilySearch.

"I believe the most immediate, substantial
contribution of this collaboration will be the
addition of local history materials," said Allen
County Public Library's Genealogy Center Manager,
Curt Witcher. The collaborative project will
digitally scan thousands of historic city
directories, as well as city and county histories
from North America. The ACPL and the Family
History Library have the largest collections of
city and county histories from North America. "I
believe the strength of our two well known, well
used, and well loved institutions working
together is a terrific benefit to the genealogical community," added
Witcher.

Once digitized, the collections will have "every
word" search capability, which allows users to
search by name, location, date, or other field
across the collection. The search results are
then linked to high quality digital images of the
original publication. Digitization efforts have
begun. New additions will be noted and
hyperlinked in the Family History Library Catalog
at FamilySearch.org as they are digitized. The
collection can be accessed currently at
<http://www.familyhistoryarchive.byu.edu>www.familyhistoryarchive.byu.edu.

FamilySearch is providing the computers,
scanners, and camera operators required to
complete the project. FamilySearch is a nonprofit
organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus
Christ of Latter-day Saints. FamilySearch
maintains the world's largest repository of
genealogical resources accessed through
FamilySearch.org, the Family History Library in
Salt Lake City, and over 4,500 family history centers in 70 countries.


Betty
bettylt@verizon.net

Professional Genealogy Research - http://mysite.verizon.net/bettylt/
Wicks,Hammond, Heintz,Bradfield,Walbridge - http://BettyT.tripod.com
Boylston Historical Society & Museum http://www.boylstonhistory.org
GenWeb Coordinator for:
Genesee, NY http://www.rootsweb.com/~nygenese
Wyoming, NY http://www.rootsweb.com/~nywyomin
Worcester, MA http://www.rootsweb.com/~maworces
Commonwealth of Massachusetts http://www.rootsweb.com/~magenweb/


--bettylt@verizon.net
2007-08-25 20:31:59 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Today in the mail I received this from my friend who subscribes to USGenNet's Service.Subj: [ANNOUNCE] USGenNet's Server Has Been Violated
Date: Sunday, August 26, 2007 7:06:56 PM
From: announce@usgennet.org
To: announce@usgennet.org, AGHP@yahoogroups.com, alhn@yahoogroups.com, USGWP-CC@usgwp.org

This notice applies to ALL websites and domains hosted on the USGenNet server.

Ancestry.Com has spidered USGenNet and is making cached web pages of websites hosted by USGenNet available for viewing through their subscription services. This is a clear violation of USGenNet's stated Conditions of Use and USGenNet will be aggressively pursuing remediation of this issue. We hope to have this resolved in the next few days.

Virginia Cisewski
President, USGenNet.Org
_______________________________________________
Announce mailing list
Announce@usgennet.org
http://www.usgennet.org/mailman/listinfo/announce
--announce@usgennet.org
2007-08-27 22:40:11 GMT
Author:Anonymous
I'm not certain I've grasped the overall theme of this thread, but I suppose Genealogy is still at the heart of it all. That suits me fine.

I've a free site, ShoeString Genealogy, that is open for visitors. No registration -- just free. There are presentations, genealogy charts and forms, quizzes, crosswords, links, stories and several good utilities, too. Oh, did I mention it was FREE? ^ >^

Happy Dae
http://www.ShoeStringGenealogy.com/ssg1.htm

--Happy Dae
<mailto:DaePowell@aol.com>
2007-08-29 00:49:08 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Dae, welcome aboard, Thanks for sharing. I just came home from attending a great talk by Jean Wilcox Hibben MA, CG her website is www.circlemending.org
She has a fabulous ability to articulate the information in a easy to understand yet funny and enjoyable method. She presented a talk
on (Induction vs Deduction). It was a well presented bits of information on determining what is primary and real and what is secondary and maybe, possibly real.

Having just read Dick EASTMANS newsletter I also am wondering if anyone has presented a list of do's and don'ts for major libraries and
societies for doing research.
Can we film with digital camera some of the documents in the past we could not get near? Can we take these new research conveniences into the above mentioned agencies or should we not purchase them for use to only learn that they will only let you in with pencil and paper. I see that MAC now has a scanning device like PC that you can use to take down minimal data and store, for in your genealogical program. Are these allowed?
Would love feed back from all that read this regarding above mentioned items.
Susi Pentico
--Susi Pentico
2007-09-08 22:53:54 GMT
Author:Anonymous
1a. Help Save U.S. Civil War Battlefields

The Civil War Battlefield Protection Bill is coming up for a vote in
the House and the Senate. The legislation would help reauthorize
federal grants for battlefield protection. If you would like to
encourage your representatives to vote for this bill, follow the
instructions on the following website:
www.battlefieldactivist.com

--rootsweb
2007-09-09 04:58:42 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Regarding DNA testing, before ordering tests check to see if your society is doing it, if so do through society because many of them can give the test a discount. SanDiego Genealogical Society is one, Southern California Genealogical Society, Inc. in Burbank California is another. I am sure there are more. Also some surname groups have discounts if you order through them. Remember DNA is Y for males and MTdna for females. A male can do test for both male and female, a female only for the mothers mothers mothers lineage.
--SusiCP@aol.com
2007-09-15 23:14:54 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Anyone done a DNA test for SCOTT family of Pittsylvania Co VA and possible from Orange Co VA. I have tested for this line of Scott. Would like to hear from any others from them. Thomas Scott was in Orange( so it seems then to Pittsylvania Co VA. He had several children. I am from son John b abt 1761 Pittsylvania Co VA died 24 Mar 1843 in Cumberland Co KY. His son Shadrack is my direct to John Cornelius b KY1818? to Cornelius Scott b IA.
Thomas had: John 1761 ie, Nimrod 1755 ie, Jacob 1760-1770.
Other heavily used names in lineage are: Walter, Nathaniel, William, Dallas, Shadrack or Chad, Betsey and Harriet. Not seen Sophia yet but maybe so she was mother to John's children
2007-09-15 23:33:33 GMT
Author:Anonymous
HI Everyone, I received an email today from he NYONEIDA list and the below is taken from it.
According to a Richard Perez-Pena Sept 18, 2007 the NEW YORK TIMES has decided not to charge for parts of its website effective Midnight Tuesday. Apparantly two years ago they started charging and have no changed their mind.
They are also opening the archives from 1987 to present without charge, also from 1851 to 1922 which are in public domain.

It also went on to say that the WALL STREET JOURNAL is the only major paper to charge for access to most of its Web site.
I do not know what data that paper would have to help genealogists but the opening of records on the New York Times site has to be a bonus to researchers. Susi
2007-09-19 19:25:41 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Wow! The blog has been busy, while I was laid up. Hope to soon start updating the site. Thanks, Susi and others for your input.
--Helen
<mailto:hsdurbin@hotmail.com>
2007-09-19 19:55:43 GMT
Author:Anonymous
As I'm typing cemetery data in for the webpages, it occurred to me that
maybe a tip list would help folks who never recorded a cemetery before. I'm
also kind of frustrated because I'm right now trying to figure out
transcriptions that are confusing. :-(

Here are some things to keep in mind when recording ANY type of genealogical
information:

1. ALWAYS type things AS IS, just as you read it. It is tempting to
"correct" names, but other researchers are looking for what IS THERE, not
what you add to "the item" - whether the info comes from a book, bible,
tombstone, courthouse record, etc. If it says Barbx, type Barbx, even if
you "know" it should be "Barby." Next to the "misspelling" put in brackets
the word "sic" like this [sic] --- that means "as is" --- that way, others
will KNOW that YOU did not just create a typo yourself.

1b. For each item/ person, if you need to make a CORRECTION, clearly label
it as a "correction" or "note" and then give the corrected information.
NEVER ADD to the original data UNLESS you mark it as a correction or a
note. Don't change my grandma's tombstone from Ruth McGary (yeah my aunt
should have used grandma's full name) to Ruth Elizabeth Lane McGary, simply
because that is not what her tombstone says (even though it is less than
ideal info). Same with Obits--- my sister's ended up with 9 errors (don't
ask!), and I magically became Judy Girard (my town) rather than my right
name---- but the only proper thing to do is use "notes" to correct the
misspelled or wrong names and errors that the paper put in.

2. CREATE a standard way of collecting your data. For example, a Cemetery
Tombstone often (not always) has NAME.... INSCRIPTION.... RELATIONSHIP
(might be the only inscription).... (possibly a BIRTH date)... a DEATH
DATE... AGE (sometimes, not always)... MISC (such as a longer
inscription).... and FOOTSTONE with initials only.... So that is APPROX 8
"categories" or columns you could create as a form to use. A 9th column
would be notes/corrections, such as clarifying how Person X is related to
Person Xxx, or correcting a misspelling, or adding a name or date you found
elsewhere.

3. When out-of-town people look at secondary sources (such as a book, or
online record), they MUST be able to know the record they read IS EXACTLY
HOW IT READS on the original. Out-of-town folks may NEVER get to stand in
front of their Great Aunt Milly's Tombstone in Timbucktwo, Wherever. A
"reading" that is NOT done "as is" may send a researcher down a zillion
wrong paths in their searches -- totally ununecessary and frustrating. So
just avoid the temptation to "correct" what you find.

4. On your notes / corrections, put HOW you KNOW the information is "wrong"
and yours is "right." Don't be afraid to use your own name on your notes!
"Per personal knowledge of Dan Lane, Chicago, ILL." is more helpful than no
info about the "corrected" bits. "Found in 1880 Census spelled Claressa"
would help clarify a spelling.

5. Even if your family has used the same spelling of your surname for 100
years, there truly is no RIGHT or WRONG spelling of a surname in old
records. As young folks say "it's just IS what it IS" -- however you find
it IS the spelling you SHOULD record, not only for your own use but for
records you share.

6. NAMES -- take extra care to record names WITH PUNCTUATION especially if
it is unclear otherwise, and with CAPS as appropriate on names (even if you
do it under a corrections column). Some Polish and Russian names begin with
Mr. -- so if you send me the name Mr obstec, is that Mr. (mister) Obstec?
Or the surname Mrobstec?

7. Even if your "Notes" and "Corrections" adds 5 pages to the material you
have transcribed, that's better than CHANGING what is actually ON the
tombstone or IN the record. I'd be so grateful to get that kind of
transcription because it (a) records the actual data "as is" plus (b) adds
material to the actual data. That helps every researcher.

8. If you made a t
--Judy Florian
2007-09-24 03:01:55 GMT
Author:Anonymous
As I'm typing cemetery data in for the webpages, it occurred to me that
maybe a tip list would help folks who never recorded a cemetery before. I'm
also kind of frustrated because I'm right now trying to figure out
transcriptions that are confusing. :-(

Here are some things to keep in mind when recording ANY type of genealogical
information:

1. ALWAYS type things AS IS, just as you read it. It is tempting to
"correct" names, but other researchers are looking for what IS THERE, not
what you add to "the item" - whether the info comes from a book, bible,
tombstone, courthouse record, etc. If it says Barbx, type Barbx, even if
you "know" it should be "Barby." Next to the "misspelling" put in brackets
the word "sic" like this [sic] --- that means "as is" --- that way, others
will KNOW that YOU did not just create a typo yourself.

1b. For each item/ person, if you need to make a CORRECTION, clearly label
it as a "correction" or "note" and then give the corrected information.
NEVER ADD to the original data UNLESS you mark it as a correction or a
note. Don't change my grandma's tombstone from Ruth McGary (yeah my aunt
should have used grandma's full name) to Ruth Elizabeth Lane McGary, simply
because that is not what her tombstone says (even though it is less than
ideal info). Same with Obits--- my sister's ended up with 9 errors (don't
ask!), and I magically became Judy Girard (my town) rather than my right
name---- but the only proper thing to do is use "notes" to correct the
misspelled or wrong names and errors that the paper put in.

2. CREATE a standard way of collecting your data. For example, a Cemetery
Tombstone often (not always) has NAME.... INSCRIPTION.... RELATIONSHIP
(might be the only inscription).... (possibly a BIRTH date)... a DEATH
DATE... AGE (sometimes, not always)... MISC (such as a longer
inscription).... and FOOTSTONE with initials only.... So that is APPROX 8
"categories" or columns you could create as a form to use. A 9th column
would be notes/corrections, such as clarifying how Person X is related to
Person Xxx, or correcting a misspelling, or adding a name or date you found
elsewhere.

3. When out-of-town people look at secondary sources (such as a book, or
online record), they MUST be able to know the record they read IS EXACTLY
HOW IT READS on the original. Out-of-town folks may NEVER get to stand in
front of their Great Aunt Milly's Tombstone in Timbucktwo, Wherever. A
"reading" that is NOT done "as is" may send a researcher down a zillion
wrong paths in their searches -- totally ununecessary and frustrating. So
just avoid the temptation to "correct" what you find.

4. On your notes / corrections, put HOW you KNOW the information is "wrong"
and yours is "right." Don't be afraid to use your own name on your notes!
"Per personal knowledge of Dan Lane, Chicago, ILL." is more helpful than no
info about the "corrected" bits. "Found in 1880 Census spelled Claressa"
would help clarify a spelling.

5. Even if your family has used the same spelling of your surname for 100
years, there truly is no RIGHT or WRONG spelling of a surname in old
records. As young folks say "it's just IS what it IS" -- however you find
it IS the spelling you SHOULD record, not only for your own use but for
records you share.

6. NAMES -- take extra care to record names WITH PUNCTUATION especially if
it is unclear otherwise, and with CAPS as appropriate on names (even if you
do it under a corrections column). Some Polish and Russian names begin with
Mr. -- so if you send me the name Mr obstec, is that Mr. (mister) Obstec?
Or the surname Mrobstec?

7. Even if your "Notes" and "Corrections" adds 5 pages to the material you
have transcribed, that's better than CHANGING what is actually ON the
tombstone or IN the record. I'd be so grateful to get that kind of
transcription because it (a) records the actual data "as is" plus (b) adds
material to the actual data. That helps every researcher.

8. If you made a t
--Judy Florian
2007-09-24 03:01:58 GMT
Author:Anonymous
As I'm typing cemetery data in for the webpages, it occurred to me that
maybe a tip list would help folks who never recorded a cemetery before. I'm
also kind of frustrated because I'm right now trying to figure out
transcriptions that are confusing. :-(

Here are some things to keep in mind when recording ANY type of genealogical
information:

1. ALWAYS type things AS IS, just as you read it. It is tempting to
"correct" names, but other researchers are looking for what IS THERE, not
what you add to "the item" - whether the info comes from a book, bible,
tombstone, courthouse record, etc. If it says Barbx, type Barbx, even if
you "know" it should be "Barby." Next to the "misspelling" put in brackets
the word "sic" like this [sic] --- that means "as is" --- that way, others
will KNOW that YOU did not just create a typo yourself.

1b. For each item/ person, if you need to make a CORRECTION, clearly label
it as a "correction" or "note" and then give the corrected information.
NEVER ADD to the original data UNLESS you mark it as a correction or a
note. Don't change my grandma's tombstone from Ruth McGary (yeah my aunt
should have used grandma's full name) to Ruth Elizabeth Lane McGary, simply
because that is not what her tombstone says (even though it is less than
ideal info). Same with Obits--- my sister's ended up with 9 errors (don't
ask!), and I magically became Judy Girard (my town) rather than my right
name---- but the only proper thing to do is use "notes" to correct the
misspelled or wrong names and errors that the paper put in.

2. CREATE a standard way of collecting your data. For example, a Cemetery
Tombstone often (not always) has NAME.... INSCRIPTION.... RELATIONSHIP
(might be the only inscription).... (possibly a BIRTH date)... a DEATH
DATE... AGE (sometimes, not always)... MISC (such as a longer
inscription).... and FOOTSTONE with initials only.... So that is APPROX 8
"categories" or columns you could create as a form to use. A 9th column
would be notes/corrections, such as clarifying how Person X is related to
Person Xxx, or correcting a misspelling, or adding a name or date you found
elsewhere.

3. When out-of-town people look at secondary sources (such as a book, or
online record), they MUST be able to know the record they read IS EXACTLY
HOW IT READS on the original. Out-of-town folks may NEVER get to stand in
front of their Great Aunt Milly's Tombstone in Timbucktwo, Wherever. A
"reading" that is NOT done "as is" may send a researcher down a zillion
wrong paths in their searches -- totally ununecessary and frustrating. So
just avoid the temptation to "correct" what you find.

4. On your notes / corrections, put HOW you KNOW the information is "wrong"
and yours is "right." Don't be afraid to use your own name on your notes!
"Per personal knowledge of Dan Lane, Chicago, ILL." is more helpful than no
info about the "corrected" bits. "Found in 1880 Census spelled Claressa"
would help clarify a spelling.

5. Even if your family has used the same spelling of your surname for 100
years, there truly is no RIGHT or WRONG spelling of a surname in old
records. As young folks say "it's just IS what it IS" -- however you find
it IS the spelling you SHOULD record, not only for your own use but for
records you share.

6. NAMES -- take extra care to record names WITH PUNCTUATION especially if
it is unclear otherwise, and with CAPS as appropriate on names (even if you
do it under a corrections column). Some Polish and Russian names begin with
Mr. -- so if you send me the name Mr obstec, is that Mr. (mister) Obstec?
Or the surname Mrobstec?

7. Even if your "Notes" and "Corrections" adds 5 pages to the material you
have transcribed, that's better than CHANGING what is actually ON the
tombstone or IN the record. I'd be so grateful to get that kind of
transcription because it (a) records the actual data "as is" plus (b) adds
material to the actual data. That helps every researcher.

8. If you made a t
--Judy Florian
2007-09-24 03:01:58 GMT
Author:Anonymous
I found this used book website - many many many wonderful books for
cemetery records, will abstracts, will index books, newspaper
abstracts, war info - many great genealogy records for most of Pa.
counties. (Greene, Washington, Fayette, Allegheny, Westmoreland,
Berks, Lancaster, Butler, Montgomery, only to name a few !)
http://www.usedbookcentral.com/cgi-bin/texis/scripts/ubc/searchbooks.html?sid=10638&author=&title=&keywords2=pennsylvania&minp=&maxp=

Judy Florian - there are also many books on various religions historys
etc.

For those of you in Allegh. Co., or searching this county - some weeks
ago I posted a message regarding the birth, marriage and deaths that
are on microfilm at the Citizens Library for ALL Pa. counties. - (I am
transcribing Wash. Co.) - those records for Allegheny Co. (from
1852 -1854) are in book form, and listed for $19.85 - I drove 3
hours to Washington,PA and printed out copies from the microfilm and
paid $50. - so 19.85 is a bargain.
Boy if we could all buy one book and share the info - WOW what info
good be shared. Only dreaming. haha But you must check this out.
(I have no affiliation with this website or sellers.)
Ruth Sprowls


----------------sprowls@ncweb.com---------------
2007-09-24 03:03:04 GMT
Author:Anonymous
I found this used book website - many many many wonderful books for
cemetery records, will abstracts, will index books, newspaper
abstracts, war info - many great genealogy records for most of Pa.
counties. (Greene, Washington, Fayette, Allegheny, Westmoreland,
Berks, Lancaster, Butler, Montgomery, only to name a few !)
http://www.usedbookcentral.com/cgi-bin/texis/scripts/ubc/searchbooks.html?sid=10638&author=&title=&keywords2=pennsylvania&minp=&maxp=

Judy Florian - there are also many books on various religions historys
etc.

For those of you in Allegh. Co., or searching this county - some weeks
ago I posted a message regarding the birth, marriage and deaths that
are on microfilm at the Citizens Library for ALL Pa. counties. - (I am
transcribing Wash. Co.) - those records for Allegheny Co. (from
1852 -1854) are in book form, and listed for $19.85 - I drove 3
hours to Washington,PA and printed out copies from the microfilm and
paid $50. - so 19.85 is a bargain.
Boy if we could all buy one book and share the info - WOW what info
good be shared. Only dreaming. haha But you must check this out.
(I have no affiliation with this website or sellers.)
Ruth Sprowls


----------------sprowls@ncweb.com---------------
2007-09-24 03:03:05 GMT
Author:Anonymous
As I'm typing cemetery data in for the webpages, it occurred to me that
maybe a tip list would help folks who never recorded a cemetery before. I'm
also kind of frustrated because I'm right now trying to figure out
transcriptions that are confusing. :-(

Here are some things to keep in mind when recording ANY type of genealogical
information:

1. ALWAYS type things AS IS, just as you read it. It is tempting to
"correct" names, but other researchers are looking for what IS THERE, not
what you add to "the item" - whether the info comes from a book, bible,
tombstone, courthouse record, etc. If it says Barbx, type Barbx, even if
you "know" it should be "Barby." Next to the "misspelling" put in brackets
the word "sic" like this [sic] --- that means "as is" --- that way, others
will KNOW that YOU did not just create a typo yourself.

1b. For each item/ person, if you need to make a CORRECTION, clearly label
it as a "correction" or "note" and then give the corrected information.
NEVER ADD to the original data UNLESS you mark it as a correction or a
note. Don't change my grandma's tombstone from Ruth McGary (yeah my aunt
should have used grandma's full name) to Ruth Elizabeth Lane McGary, simply
because that is not what her tombstone says (even though it is less than
ideal info). Same with Obits--- my sister's ended up with 9 errors (don't
ask!), and I magically became Judy Girard (my town) rather than my right
name---- but the only proper thing to do is use "notes" to correct the
misspelled or wrong names and errors that the paper put in.

2. CREATE a standard way of collecting your data. For example, a Cemetery
Tombstone often (not always) has NAME.... INSCRIPTION.... RELATIONSHIP
(might be the only inscription).... (possibly a BIRTH date)... a DEATH
DATE... AGE (sometimes, not always)... MISC (such as a longer
inscription).... and FOOTSTONE with initials only.... So that is APPROX 8
"categories" or columns you could create as a form to use. A 9th column
would be notes/corrections, such as clarifying how Person X is related to
Person Xxx, or correcting a misspelling, or adding a name or date you found
elsewhere.

3. When out-of-town people look at secondary sources (such as a book, or
online record), they MUST be able to know the record they read IS EXACTLY
HOW IT READS on the original. Out-of-town folks may NEVER get to stand in
front of their Great Aunt Milly's Tombstone in Timbucktwo, Wherever. A
"reading" that is NOT done "as is" may send a researcher down a zillion
wrong paths in their searches -- totally ununecessary and frustrating. So
just avoid the temptation to "correct" what you find.

4. On your notes / corrections, put HOW you KNOW the information is "wrong"
and yours is "right." Don't be afraid to use your own name on your notes!
"Per personal knowledge of Dan Lane, Chicago, ILL." is more helpful than no
info about the "corrected" bits. "Found in 1880 Census spelled Claressa"
would help clarify a spelling.

5. Even if your family has used the same spelling of your surname for 100
years, there truly is no RIGHT or WRONG spelling of a surname in old
records. As young folks say "it's just IS what it IS" -- however you find
it IS the spelling you SHOULD record, not only for your own use but for
records you share.

6. NAMES -- take extra care to record names WITH PUNCTUATION especially if
it is unclear otherwise, and with CAPS as appropriate on names (even if you
do it under a corrections column). Some Polish and Russian names begin with
Mr. -- so if you send me the name Mr obstec, is that Mr. (mister) Obstec?
Or the surname Mrobstec?

7. Even if your "Notes" and "Corrections" adds 5 pages to the material you
have transcribed, that's better than CHANGING what is actually ON the
tombstone or IN the record. I'd be so grateful to get that kind of
transcription because it (a) records the actual data "as is" plus (b) adds
material to the actual data. That helps every researcher.

8. If you made a t
--Judy Florian
2007-09-24 03:05:46 GMT
Author:Anonymous
As I'm typing cemetery data in for the webpages, it occurred to me that
maybe a tip list would help folks who never recorded a cemetery before. I'm
also kind of frustrated because I'm right now trying to figure out
transcriptions that are confusing. :-(

Here are some things to keep in mind when recording ANY type of genealogical
information:

1. ALWAYS type things AS IS, just as you read it. It is tempting to
"correct" names, but other researchers are looking for what IS THERE, not
what you add to "the item" - whether the info comes from a book, bible,
tombstone, courthouse record, etc. If it says Barbx, type Barbx, even if
you "know" it should be "Barby." Next to the "misspelling" put in brackets
the word "sic" like this [sic] --- that means "as is" --- that way, others
will KNOW that YOU did not just create a typo yourself.

1b. For each item/ person, if you need to make a CORRECTION, clearly label
it as a "correction" or "note" and then give the corrected information.
NEVER ADD to the original data UNLESS you mark it as a correction or a
note. Don't change my grandma's tombstone from Ruth McGary (yeah my aunt
should have used grandma's full name) to Ruth Elizabeth Lane McGary, simply
because that is not what her tombstone says (even though it is less than
ideal info). Same with Obits--- my sister's ended up with 9 errors (don't
ask!), and I magically became Judy Girard (my town) rather than my right
name---- but the only proper thing to do is use "notes" to correct the
misspelled or wrong names and errors that the paper put in.

2. CREATE a standard way of collecting your data. For example, a Cemetery
Tombstone often (not always) has NAME.... INSCRIPTION.... RELATIONSHIP
(might be the only inscription).... (possibly a BIRTH date)... a DEATH
DATE... AGE (sometimes, not always)... MISC (such as a longer
inscription).... and FOOTSTONE with initials only.... So that is APPROX 8
"categories" or columns you could create as a form to use. A 9th column
would be notes/corrections, such as clarifying how Person X is related to
Person Xxx, or correcting a misspelling, or adding a name or date you found
elsewhere.

3. When out-of-town people look at secondary sources (such as a book, or
online record), they MUST be able to know the record they read IS EXACTLY
HOW IT READS on the original. Out-of-town folks may NEVER get to stand in
front of their Great Aunt Milly's Tombstone in Timbucktwo, Wherever. A
"reading" that is NOT done "as is" may send a researcher down a zillion
wrong paths in their searches -- totally ununecessary and frustrating. So
just avoid the temptation to "correct" what you find.

4. On your notes / corrections, put HOW you KNOW the information is "wrong"
and yours is "right." Don't be afraid to use your own name on your notes!
"Per personal knowledge of Dan Lane, Chicago, ILL." is more helpful than no
info about the "corrected" bits. "Found in 1880 Census spelled Claressa"
would help clarify a spelling.

5. Even if your family has used the same spelling of your surname for 100
years, there truly is no RIGHT or WRONG spelling of a surname in old
records. As young folks say "it's just IS what it IS" -- however you find
it IS the spelling you SHOULD record, not only for your own use but for
records you share.

6. NAMES -- take extra care to record names WITH PUNCTUATION especially if
it is unclear otherwise, and with CAPS as appropriate on names (even if you
do it under a corrections column). Some Polish and Russian names begin with
Mr. -- so if you send me the name Mr obstec, is that Mr. (mister) Obstec?
Or the surname Mrobstec?

7. Even if your "Notes" and "Corrections" adds 5 pages to the material you
have transcribed, that's better than CHANGING what is actually ON the
tombstone or IN the record. I'd be so grateful to get that kind of
transcription because it (a) records the actual data "as is" plus (b) adds
material to the actual data. That helps every researcher.

8. If you made a t
--Judy Florian
2007-09-24 03:05:47 GMT
Author:Anonymous
8. If you made a transcription and already shared it, but later notice that
you made a TYPO, then follow up with a correction. ASK everyone you know
that has a copy of what you transcribed to write your correction on the
pages. "Per Milly Xxxxx who made this transciption, this name ___ is a typo
and should be ____." Helps to put a date the correction was made too
because its surprising how quickly our minds forget. LOL


Hope these tips help.

Judy Florian

--Judy Florian
2007-09-24 03:07:53 GMT
Author:Anonymous
I forgot one tip :

9. If on tombstone transcriptions you desire to put GSP or directions, then
PLEASE
9a. LABEL the abbreviations (such as "GPS Direction" as a column header) and
9b. Be sure to keep the N, E, S, W, or NN, NW, etc. as far away from the
name as possible, or what you intended as "Charles Smith" might be
mistakenly read as "W Charles Smith" and
9c. TELL the beginning point from which the direction was made. Is the
location NNW from the Entrance? From a road called ___?

My point: Even if you think your record is clear, LABEL all the columns and
info with exactly what you are trying to convey.



On 9/23/07, Judy Florian <cageycat@gmail.com> wrote:
--Judy Florian
2007-09-24 03:09:02 GMT
Author:Anonymous
I found this used book website - many many many wonderful books for
cemetery records, will abstracts, will index books, newspaper
abstracts, war info - many great genealogy records for most of Pa.
counties. (Greene, Washington, Fayette, Allegheny, Westmoreland,
Berks, Lancaster, Butler, Montgomery, only to name a few !)
http://www.usedbookcentral.com/cgi-bin/texis/scripts/ubc/searchbooks.html?sid=10638&author=&title=&keywords2=pennsylvania&minp=&maxp=

Judy Florian - there are also many books on various religions historys
etc.

For those of you in Allegh. Co., or searching this county - some weeks
ago I posted a message regarding the birth, marriage and deaths that
are on microfilm at the Citizens Library for ALL Pa. counties. - (I am
transcribing Wash. Co.) - those records for Allegheny Co. (from
1852 -1854) are in book form, and listed for $19.85 - I drove 3
hours to Washington,PA and printed out copies from the microfilm and
paid $50. - so 19.85 is a bargain.
Boy if we could all buy one book and share the info - WOW what info
good be shared. Only dreaming. haha But you must check this out.
(I have no affiliation with this website or sellers.)
Ruth Sprowls sprowls@ncweb.com
2007-09-24 03:21:43 GMT
Author:Anonymous
I found this used book website - many many many wonderful books for
cemetery records, will abstracts, will index books, newspaper
abstracts, war info - many great genealogy records for most of Pa.
counties. (Greene, Washington, Fayette, Allegheny, Westmoreland,
Berks, Lancaster, Butler, Montgomery, only to name a few !)
http://www.usedbookcentral.com/cgi-bin/texis/scripts/ubc/searchbooks.html?sid=10638&author=&title=&keywords2=pennsylvania&minp=&maxp=

Judy Florian - there are also many books on various religions historys
etc.

For those of you in Allegh. Co., or searching this county - some weeks
ago I posted a message regarding the birth, marriage and deaths that
are on microfilm at the Citizens Library for ALL Pa. counties. - (I am
transcribing Wash. Co.) - those records for Allegheny Co. (from
1852 -1854) are in book form, and listed for $19.85 - I drove 3
hours to Washington,PA and printed out copies from the microfilm and
paid $50. - so 19.85 is a bargain.
Boy if we could all buy one book and share the info - WOW what info
good be shared. Only dreaming. haha But you must check this out.
(I have no affiliation with this website or sellers.)
Ruth Sprowls sprowls@ncweb.com
2007-09-24 03:21:43 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Everyone heads up the Genealogyforum.org is about to launch a newspaper again. More to follow with some well known writers as part of the crew. SusiCP@cox.net
2007-09-24 03:26:07 GMT
Author:Anonymous
HI, all found a great new adventure. I think it is the best adventure in a long time. Please check out this blog and you may want to join them.
It is in regards to the Lost Colony.
http://www.the-lost-colony.blogspot.com/

This will get you to the site and get you started on a lot of new data, information, and history on what may end up being some of your family.

The list of names regarding these colonists are on this site.

I am posting other sites for you to check out also.

http://hometown.aol.com/peedeendn/myhomepage/index.html
PEE DEE Indian Nation of Beaver Creek
--SusiCP@aol.com
<mailto:SusiCP@aol.com>
2007-10-11 00:56:38 GMT
Author:Anonymous
The Lost Colony blog and project is the work of Roberta Estes and this has been something she has worked on for a very long time. She has joined up with other teams and made this very worthwhile search a possiblity.There is YDNA and MT-DNA and lots of other projects that are out there being used today discussed. And how the best way to find the Indian heritage you may or may not know you have. Nothing perfect yet, but it has been very helpful for many people and some have already interlinked there data. WAY TO GO.
--Susi
<mailto:SusiCP@aol.com>
2007-10-11 01:00:44 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Picked this up this morning. I find this with mixed emotions, because I do not know the lay of the land for places to find something warm to eat or drink, if this is a plus in thought but careless in placement. We all know we can not mix the two ingredients together and get a positive return. I also am not sure if moving the documents to Moundville will be bad or good.There is not enough stated yet on if they will be available to us. If the placement is moving all the data because land and space more available then let it be to preserve things longer. Other orgainizations have moved libraries with out damage and actually created a better repository. Also some orgainizations, (NYB&GS) for example are destroying what they created and doing what appears to be illegal things. So we need to respond ask for more information, be open minded but ever vigilante in preserving what was given the government to preserve. Susi


Stella Cotrill - Oct 9, 2007 UPDATE on SAVING the WEST VIRGINIA ARCHIVES
************
T. Lockard - Oct 9, 2007 The following story appeared in Sunday's Charleston Gazette-Mail.
Now is the time that we should be sending protest e-mails
to the Governor's office at :

Governor@WVGov.org

A copy of your e-mail should be sent to Phil Kabler at
philk@wvgazette.com
*****************
Feel free to send this information to all your friends.
We would like for it to be posted on as many web sites as possible.

We should show the Governor that the Archives Library
should not be turned into a cafe/gift shop.

Thanks for all of your help,
Virginia Gillespie
(Mining Your History Foundation)



Sunday Gazette-Mail
September 30, 2007

Cultural Center bids to open soon
By Phil Kabler
Staff writer

Speaking of the Cultural Center, a crew working on the redesign and reconstruction of the Capitol cafeteria, including project consultant Rod Stoner and representatives from Daniel Design, ZMM architects, Department of Administration, Education and the Arts, and Culture and History made a side-trip Thursday to tour the possible (probable?) site for a cafe/gift shop, which would be located in the current archives library.

Administration spokeswoman Diane Holley confirmed the site inspection, but insisted no final decision has been made regarding use of the space on the north side of the Cultural Center's first floor.

She said the group was reviewing the logistics of locating a cafe in the Cultural Center, which would serve a limited menu of sandwiches, soups and salads prepared in the Capitol food court's kitchens.

If the administration green-lights the project, which seems likely, they can expect a fight from hundreds of members of historical society members and genealogists.
--Susi
2007-10-18 17:11:55 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Hi Laura and Susi,
Many years ago I touched base with Susi, and I think I have communicated with you as well Laura. Wanted to let everyone interested in Greene County PA and Washington County PA know that I have uploaded my family tree to the Ancestry.com web site. It is named "Rhome, McManus, Milota Family." There are many facts for Greene county researchers and I would love to hear from others about errors or queries that they may have regarding this information. Not every fact is 100% certain, but I have gotten as close to factual information as I can living in Cleveland, Ohio, working full-time and now grandmothering two grandsons every weekend. I'd love to spend a month ferreting out materials from the various court houses.
One question I have for all you researchers out there has to do with burials. I have many relatives who I know are dead, but I have only turned up a small number of grave sites. Were there any regulations about recording interments? Or did folks sometimes bury someone in the back of the farm and never really passed the info on to anyone? Just curious?
Happy hunting cousins!
--Marcy Milota
<mailto:milota@jcu.edu>
2008-01-15 23:55:50 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Dear Helen--
So sorry! I was thinking of obits posted by Laura Nelle... when I put this entry together. If you want to link to my pages, feel free. Helen, I also wanted to point out that one of my uncles married a Durbin. You might check out the name in my index to see if you know this person.

All the best,
Marcy
--Marcy Milota
<mailto:milota@jcu.edu>
2008-01-16 00:11:41 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Marcy All sorry I have not blogged in a bit seems my Daughter
Bj had surgery and I got a concussion so all things sorta slowed down.
Daughter is recovering from back surgery and so far all is well :>).
I am having good and bad days with fuzzy tummy from the concussion yet.
So I am now back to functioning a bit.
Marcy I will write to you. Do you write to Dennis Rhome in OHIO who is also a
descendant.? DRHOME@aol.com.

He is on the road alot so doesn't always respond quickly.

:>) Blessings and Happy New Year to everyone.

Susi
--just me Susi
<mailto:SusiCP@aol.coom>
2008-01-16 00:35:32 GMT
Author:Anonymous
OOPS my add is not right see still fuzzy.
SusiCP@aol.com or SusiCP@cox.net

Also this is correct URL for PA to make changes.

http://users.rcn.com/timarg/PaHR-Access#Sample%20Letters%20&%20Forms
--Susi from roots list
2008-01-16 01:22:48 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Any one with W.VA Family , would want to go to this site . This site also has
death records , plus births and marriages. " No waiting on this site.
Go about half way down and just click on ,
Births Deaths and Marriages.
There are other collections there as well.

_West Virginia Archives and History_
(http://www.wvculture.org/history/archivesindex.aspx)
FamilySearch has online death certificates for Ohio .
Ohio between 1908-1953
You will have to register at the site but it is a free site.
Once you register , you have to wait until they send you a pass word.
This could take a couple of hours to a few days
There are other collections there as well.

And what about Kentucky , _Kentucky Vital Records Project_
(http://kyvitals.com/vis/search/search_death_recs.php)
2008-01-16 01:45:35 GMT
Author:Anonymous
We in San Diego are doing fine we did move up down and sideways but no damage or injuries. Sister in law in Riverside is fine. Will contact grandson later figure he should be okay also in Northridge. Earthquake was closest to Mary. Susi
2008-07-29 20:13:05 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Helen, Love the site as always brings back so many memories of those who have gone. Maybe we can chat soon. Love your cousin debbie
--Debbie McCroskey
<mailto:debbiekmac@yahoo.com>
2008-08-14 03:40:00 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Has anyone read Nate Z note on PA-ROOTS wow have they grown. I like their idea. If anyone wants copy email me at SusiCP@aol.com
2008-09-29 19:13:51 GMT
Author:Anonymous
OK HUFFMAN/HOFFMAN researchers, I think I have made a break through on this line. I sorta stumbled into the information on a whim.

Contact me if you want to hear what I found. Man right in plain site and could not see.
--SusiCP@aol.com
2009-03-06 21:10:31 GMT
Author:Anonymous
SELLERS/KELLERS and others tie into the Huffman/Hoffman Line for real. Like I didn't already know that.


--SusiCP@aol.com
2009-03-06 21:14:22 GMT
Author:Anonymous
You have been a great help to me in my MOORE/Foulk connection and other areas.
2009-03-18 21:02:44 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Much happening in the Genealogical world now. Blogs are up everywhere. It is nice to see so many people sharing thoughts openly. A major conference is coming to Glendale, Ca in June. Hope to see many there.
Also if you have kin in western USA you may find Mesa LDS library the site of much of your needed information.
--SusiCP@aol.com
2009-03-19 17:44:50 GMT
Author:Anonymous
WE are working on connecting more Pentico's together ie Penticoff and maybe was Benninghoff.
2009-03-29 21:11:36 GMT
Author:Anonymous
http://www.tngenweb.org/tnletters/usa-west.htm

might want to check out this map
2009-03-29 21:19:26 GMT
Author:Anonymous
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~genealogylookup/chatroom.html

Here is where I do data for genealogists to learn. Come join us.
SusiCP
2009-03-29 21:20:50 GMT
Author:Anonymous
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~genealogylookup/chatroom.html

Here is where I do data for genealogists to learn. Come join us.
SusiCP
2009-03-29 21:20:51 GMT
Author:Anonymous
I do Vital chats on Thursday with cousin Rita. Susi
2009-03-29 21:22:27 GMT
Author:Anonymous
http://www.cfcjewelrysupplies.com/

This is my sons website for his jewelry and templates and scribes and girdlemarker. Susi
2009-03-29 21:23:15 GMT
Author:Anonymous
http://www.cfcjewelrysupplies.com/

This is my sons website for his jewelry and templates and scribes and girdlemarker. Susi
2009-03-29 21:23:15 GMT
Author:Anonymous

Ruth shared this url that anyone may need to do ship research in PA
.http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~GENHOME/ship01.htm

Susi
2009-04-07 20:18:33 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Not sure anyone is reading these notes of late. Lots more data headed this way. Keep eyes open...

http://www.geneamusings.com/

2009-04-07 20:24:38 GMT
Author:Anonymous
http://www.geneamusings.com/
This one for genealogy musings by Randy
2009-04-07 20:26:20 GMT
Author:Anonymous
http://cvgencafe.blogspot.com/ and this one
http://www.progenealogists.com/top50genealogy2009.htm

Susi
2009-04-07 20:27:12 GMT
Author:Anonymous
http://www.mendeley.com/

may want to consider this for genealogical help
--SusiCP@aol.com
2009-04-07 20:28:35 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Just received this and may help everyone if they respond. Taken from the Ohio Monroe Co. List. From Tim Gruber who is spokesperson for group. from Tim Gruber, a spokesperson for PaHR - Access regarding PA death records. ?
http://users.rcn.com/timarg/PaHR-Access.htm

Here is the link to the website about the grassroots effort to have Pennsylvania make its ?olderstate death certificates much more accessible and available online similar to how they have started to do in other states: http://users.rcn.com/timarg/PaHR-Access.htm . We hope you will join in on this effort and if you would pass this information onto anyone you know who is into Pennsylvania genealogy and history including out of state residents.
?
If have trouble accessing go to Google or a similar search engine and type in "pahr-access".



2009-04-12 21:40:46 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Just received this and may help everyone if they respond. Taken from the Ohio Monroe Co. List. From Tim Gruber who is spokesperson for group. from Tim Gruber, a spokesperson for PaHR - Access regarding PA death records. ?
http://users.rcn.com/timarg/PaHR-Access.htm

Here is the link to the website about the grassroots effort to have Pennsylvania make its ?olderstate death certificates much more accessible and available online similar to how they have started to do in other states: http://users.rcn.com/timarg/PaHR-Access.htm . We hope you will join in on this effort and if you would pass this information onto anyone you know who is into Pennsylvania genealogy and history including out of state residents.
?
If have trouble accessing go to Google or a similar search engine and type in "pahr-access".



2009-04-12 21:41:22 GMT
Author:Anonymous
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~GENHOME/ship01.htm
Ships to PA site..
http://ssdcgraveyardrabbit.blogspot.com/2009/04/la-vista-memorial-park-video.html

http://www.familysearch.org


--SusiCP@aol.com
2009-04-14 19:38:00 GMT
Author:Anonymous
http://www.progenealogists.com/top50genealogy2009.htm

fifty most popular sites for genealogist
--SusiCP@aol.com
2009-04-14 19:39:13 GMT
Author:Anonymous

New software for research, May want to try it.

--SusiCP@aol.com
2009-04-14 19:40:53 GMT
Author:Anonymous
http://www.mendeley.com/

Here it is oops.
2009-04-14 19:41:57 GMT
Author:Anonymous
http://www.mendeley.com/

Here it is oops.
2009-04-14 19:41:58 GMT
Author:Anonymous
How many of you gather old postcards and picture postcards for research? Do you ever go to a antique shop or pawn shop and look for old cards?
I did a talk on Photos many years ago and now Colleen Fitzpatrick has done an excellent job of putting much knowledge on photographic research in a easily understood format for us all to read and enjoy.Her new book is called THE DEAD HORSE INVESTIGATION-Forensic Photo Analysis for Everyone. So if your have a dead end it is another way to find a hole through the dead end.
Watch for old photo cards and postcards that may have history of the area your ancestors were in to add to your data to make their lives more real.

--SusiCP@aol.com
2009-04-14 19:48:11 GMT
Author:Anonymous
I just posted my information sources to the San Diego Genealogy Society for their web site and thought that I should add it here.
I did a talk on THE LOST COLONY and many may find this interesting research regarding their families.


--SusiCP@aol.com
2009-05-11 18:57:56 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Books for use Lost Colony sources
THE SURVIVAL OF THE LOST COLONY
WILLIAM V PATE
Write to 2550 Thrower Road, Hope Mills, NC 2839960.
new book.
ROANOKE: SOLVING THE MYSTERY OF THE LOST COLONY BY LEE
MILLER excellent sourcing etc

SET FAIR FOR ROANOKE: VOYAGES AND COLONIES 1584-1606.



DAVID BEERS QUINN Text Format

--SusiCP@aol.com
2009-05-11 19:02:07 GMT
Author:Anonymous
great for lay people and students

ROANOKE ISLAND THE BEGINNING OF
ENGLISH AMERICA
DAVID STICK

--SusiCP@aol.com
2009-05-11 19:03:32 GMT
Author:Anonymous
THE ABANDONED COLONY
KAREN ORDAHL KUPPERMAN
formal writings

LIFE IN THE THIRTEEN COLONIES, NORTH CAROLINA
RICHARD WORTH
--SusiCP@aol.com
2009-05-11 19:04:46 GMT
Author:Anonymous
URLS for Research
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~molcgdrg/na/naindex.htm
Lost Colony Genealogy & DNA Research site

http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/%7Emolcgdrg/sur/1surnames.htm surname list

http://www.the-lost-colony.blogspot.com/
Much information here Links to other data etc.

--SusiCP@aol.com
2009-05-11 19:07:25 GMT
Author:Anonymous

http://colonialwilliamsburg.org/winter09/white.cfm
White’s Watercolors

http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/
central criminal court England

http://www.hrionline.ac.uk/oldbailey/search/browse/browse_linked_records.html More Old Bailey data

http://tutelotribe.com Indian Info
http://www.ncalgonquians.com/ Indian Info

http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2008/08/lumbee-surnames-who-knew-there-were-so.html

Indian Info

I

http://www.chesapeakebay.net/captainjohnsmith.aspx?menuitem=19591
Capt. John Smith data

Surnames of Interest in English Records 1500
large file and can email.
contact SusiCP@aol.com

Roberta Estes Co ordinator to join list.
restes@comcast.net


--SusiCP@aol.com
2009-05-11 19:09:04 GMT
Author:Anonymous
This is the references used along with emails and data exchanged with the Lost Colony Research group to write the report and talk given last Saturday at the San Diego Genealogical Society.
If you have dead ends in VA, NC, SC, and the southern region you may tie to this topic.
--SusiCP@aol.com
2009-05-11 19:11:26 GMT
Author:Anonymous
I learned recently of another colony no one has addressed and am going to see what more I can learn about it. No wonder we have so many dead ends. It involves more than 500 peoples.
--SusiCP@aol.com
2009-05-11 19:39:32 GMT
Author:Anonymous
Wouldn't it be fascinating if the Lost Colony mystery could be solved.
--L Goodson
<http://www.allrgifts4u.com>
2009-05-15 12:06:58 GMT
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