Links to the articles written by Forrest that go with these pictures listed below!

Pictures Along Route 40


Formerly the National Pike

Stories courtesy of the Observer-Reporter
and /or
Photos courtesy of the Observer-Reporter
Observer-Reporter Home Page

I, Helen S. Durbin, want to personally thank The Observer-Reporter staff 
for graciously permitting me to post these wonderful stories!

The National Pike Story part 1
The National Pike Story part 2
The National Pike Story part 3
The National Pike Story part 4
The National Pike Story part 5
The National Pike Story part 6
The National Pike Story part 7
The National Pike Story part 8
The National Pike Story part 9
The National Pike Story part 10
The National Pike Story part 11
The National Pike Story part 12
The National Pike Story part 13
The National Pike Story part 14
The National Pike Story part 15
The National Pike Story part 16
The National Pike Story part 17
The National Pike Story part 18
The National Pike Story part 19
The National Pike Story part 20
The National Pike Story part 21
The National Pike Story part 22
The National Pike Story part 23
The National Pike Story part 24
The National Pike Story part 25
The National Pike Story part 26
The National Pike Story part 27
The National Pike Story part 28
The National Pike Story part 29
Ghosts of West Alexander Lawson


Some pictures of the flood on National Road, Fulton, Wheeling, taken about 3:30 p.m., Thursday, March 19, 1936, at crest of flood 55.6 feet. Looking east.




The LaFayette Inn in West Alexander, razed several years ago, by the owners of the Grimes Garage and wood from inn used in the building of the garage.
The well known LaFayette Inn at West Alexander was just as well known a wagon stand in the lush days of the old Pike. It was operated for many years by Joseph Lawson. LaFayette stopped here during his visit to the United States in 1825.
Back
Back to Lawson


Taken in 1953, this is a picture of Rogers Tavern, 4.5 miles west of Claysville. It was first kept by a man by the name of Rogers and then by Jacob and Michael Dougherty, and in 1830 by Jacob Jones, later it was taken over by John Valentine and was operated in connection with his tavern just west of here. It is now the home of William A. Guess. Still standing in 2000.
Back


The West Alexander Toll House, razed several years ago, by the owners of the land it sat on.
The pictures seen above are of the old Toll House that stood on the old Routh 40, just east of West Alexander. This is one of the few remaining toll houses still standing but is is badly in need of repair. These buildings are practically the only link remaining with the historic National Pike of by-gone years. At one time they were located every few miles to collect the tolls from the almost endless stream of vehicle traffic, moving westward and carrying the lifeblood of this ____ section.
Back


Here is the Sign of the Black House Tavern, a noted hostelry in its day, as it looked in 1953 on the National Pike in Claysville. It was opened June 11, 1821 by James Sargent. It was owned in the 1870's by Dr. George Inglis. His son, Dr. William D. Inglis, now of Columbus, O., was a famous W. & J. football player and coach in the 1890's. Still standing in 2000.


The "S" Bridge tavern, seen above (below), was one of the most famous taverns on the old National Pike. It stood across the Pike from the famous old "S" bridge which lies almost midway between Washington and Claysville. It is believed that this picture was taken near the turn of the century. Unfortunately none of the people seen above could be identified.
Back


The "S" Bridge west of Washington is an engineering marvel. The old Kelly "S" Bridge tavern, which burned Feburary 27, 1909, is seen across the bridge and to the left. The road to the right is to Taylorstown. This photo was taken by Allie MacLaughlin, son of Rev. Alexander MacLaughlin, D.D., pastor of the South Buffalo United Presbyterian Church. The parsonage was just across the Pike from the Kelly home, and MacLaughlin lived there. Mrs George Lyle of Claysville is a daughter of Dr. MacLaughlin. This old picture was given to Earle R. Forrest by Miss Christine Bruce, Washington R. D. 5, on December 9, 1953.


Miller's Wagon stand, five miles west of Washington is shown in the picture above, which was taken in 1914. Previous to 1836 Levi Wilson located here and entertained the first wagoners on the Pike. In 1836, John Miller moved here from Pratt Hollow, east of Cumberland, Md., and conducted the stand. This house was built about 1813. Still standing in 2000!



The Old Globe Inn, built in 1798 and razed in 1891, was located on the west side of South Main street where the DeNormandie Building, at the corner of West Strawberry avenue, now stands. Five Presidents of the United States--Monroe, Jackson, Harrison, Taylor and Polk, also Henry Clay and Daniel Webster--were its guests. On May 20, 1825, LaFayette was also entertained there. This picture was copied from an old photograph was taken by Rogers just before it was torn down.
Back


The East Maiden Street Toll Stop.
The above is the tollgate which formerly stood on East Maiden Street. These tollgates, were placed at intervals alont the old National Pike (Route 40O, and were used for the collection of tolls till such time tools were removed from the Pike in 1905. this one that stood on East Maiden street will be recalled by the older residents of Washington even though it was razed many years ago.



The Beck-Ringland Tavern, Scenery Hill, as it appeared when this picture was taken in 1953. It was kept as early as 1827, by James Beck, but a year later he was succeeded by George Ringland. About 1840 David Raily followed Ringland and then James Noble. Othere later were John Taylor, Henry Taylor, Jesse Core and William Robinson. This was a stage house, but did a general business. Still standing and a business in 2000!
Back



The Gal's House Tavern three miles west Scenery Hill, as it appeared in 1953 when this picture was taken. This was a popular wagon stand all throught the Pike era and was kept by three sisters, all of the Dague family. Hence the name, "Gals House."
Back



Taken in 1953 in Scenery Hill the picture shows the Riggle Tavern kept by Zephaniah Riggle, who also operated taverns in Centerville. Later the tavern was the home of Dr. Byron Clark, who started the first mail order business in the United States. His wife selected the same Scenery Hill for the post office.
Back



This is Little's Wagon Stand picture taken in 1953 which stands 3.8 miles east of Washington. Moses Little kept a wagon stand here during the Pike days. The age of the house is not known, but from its appearance it must have been built about 1820, or earlier.
Back




1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005
mailslo

mailslo